A Glossary: Or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to Customs, Proverbs, Etc., which Have Been Thought to Require Illustration, in the Words of English Authors, Particularly Shakespeare, and His Contemporaries, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J.R. Smith, 1859 - English language
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Page 217 - And then it started, like a guilty thing Upon a fearful summons. I have heard The cock, that is the trumpet to the morn, Doth with his lofty and shrill-sounding throat Awake the god of day; and at his warning. Whether in sea or fire, in earth or air, The extravagant and erring spirit hies To his confine; and of the truth herein This present object made probation.
Page iv - Glossary; or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to Customs, Proverbs, etc., which have been thought to require illustration in the works of English authors, particularly Shakespeare and his contemporaries.
Page 233 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods, or to reside In thrilling regions of thick-ribbed ice ; To be imprison'd in the viewless winds, And blown with restless violence round about The pendent world...
Page 262 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid on a dolphin's back Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song, And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 113 - Come, be not ashamed of thy virtues, old stump: honour's a good brooch to wear in a man's hat at all times.
Page 65 - And am content to coin them into profit, And look upon their kindness, and take more, And look on that; still bearing them in hand, Letting the cherry knock against their lips, And draw it by their mouths, and back again.
Page 477 - MONMOUTH, &c., to his Capture and Execution, with a full account of the Bloody Assize, and copious Biographical Notices.
Page 483 - SPECIMENS of Cornish Provincial Dialect, collected and arranged by Uncle Jan Treenodle, with some Introductory Remarks and a Glossary by an Antiquarian Friend; also a Selection of Songs and other Pieces connected with Cornwall. Post 8vo, with a, curious portrait of Dolly Pentreath, cloth.
Page 231 - ... who hath had three suits to his back, six shirts to his body, horse to ride, and weapon to wear; But mice and rats, and such small deer, Have been Tom's food for seven long year.
Page 297 - And because the breath of flowers is far sweeter in the air, where it comes and goes, like the warbling of music, than in the hand, therefore nothing is more fit for that delight, than to know what be the flowers and plants that do best perfume the air. Roses, damask and red, are fast flowers of their smells ; so that you may walk by a whole row of them, and find nothing of their sweetness : yea, though it be in a morning's dew.

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