John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience, and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling

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SUNY Press, 1987 - Philosophy - 325 pages
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Thomas Alexander shows that the primary, guiding concern of Dewey's philosophy is his theory of aesthetic experience. He directly challenges those critics, most notably Stephen Pepper and Benedetto Croce, who argued that this area is the least consistent part of Dewey's thought.

The author demonstrates that the fundamental concept in Dewey's system is that of "experience" and that paradigmatic treatment of experience is to be found in Dewey's analysis of aesthetics and art. The confusions resulting from the neglect of this orientation have led to prolonged misunderstandings, eventual neglect, and unwarranted popularity for ideas at odds with the genuine thrust of Dewey's philosophical concerns. By exposing the underlying aesthetic foundations of Dewey's philosophy, Alexander aims to rectify many of these errors, generating a fruitful new interest in Dewey.
  

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Contents

The PepperCroce Thesis
1
The Logic of Life
15
The Metaphysics of Experience
57
The Embodied Mind
119
The Art of Experience
183
Creativity Criticism and Community
269
Notes
279
Bibliography
313
Index
319
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About the author (1987)

Thomas M. Alexander is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

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