The apples of New York, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Page 10 - our Apples are, without doubt as good as those of England, and much fairer to look to, and so are the Pears, but we have not got all the Sorts. * * * Our People of late years, have run so much upon Orchards, that in a village near Boston, consisting of about forty Families, they made near ten Thousand Barrels [of cider].
Page 27 - kind " as herein used shall be understood to apply to those general classes of fruits which are grouped together in common usage without regard to their exact botanical relationship, as apple, cherry, grape, peach, plum, raspberry, etc.
Page 28 - Publication consists (1) in the distribution of a printed description of the variety named, giving the distinguishing characters of fruit, tree, etc., or (2) in the publication of a new name for a variety that is properly described elsewhere; such...
Page 11 - Subsequently a considerable trade must have resulted, for in 1773 it was stated by the younger Collinson, that while the English apple crop had failed that year, American apples had been found an admirable substitute, some of the merchants having imported great quantities of them. In his words : " They are, notwithstanding, too expensive for common eating, being sold for two pence, three pence, and even four pence an apple. But their flavor is much superior to anything we can pretend to, and I even...
Page 168 - Stem rather short, varying from thick and swollen to moderately slender. Cavity acuminate, varying from medium in depth and width to deep and broad, sometimes partly russeted, obscurely furrowed. Calyx large, open. Basin pretty regular, moderately deep, medium in width to rather narrow, moderately abrupt. Skin rather thick and tough, smooth, bright greenish-yellow or pale yellow, washed, mottled and striped with two shades of red and clouded with whitish scarf-skin over the base. Highly colored specimens...
Page 27 - ... synonym can be advanced to the position of leading name. The several varieties bearing identical names should be distinguished by adding the name of the author who first described each sort, or by adding some other suitable distinguishing term that will insure their identity in catalogues or discussions. (d) Existing American names of varieties, which conflict with earlier published foreign names of the same, or other varieties, but which have become thoroughly established through long usage,...
Page 330 - I can appeal to many persons of distinction, and of nice tastes, who have travelled a great distance to view the tree, and taste the fruit ; but to investigate the cause of an effect, so much out of the common course of nature, must, I think, be attended with difficulty. The only solution that I can conceive is, that the corcula, or hearts of two seeds, the one from a sour, the other from a sweet apple, might so incorporate in the ground as to produce but one plant ; or that farina from blossoms...
Page xix - TREATISE ON' THE CULTURE AND MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT TREES. By WILLIAM FORSYTH, Gardener to his Majesty. 8vo. 7th Edit.
Page 27 - ... control the spelling and pronunciation of the name from which it was derived. (d) A variety imported from a foreign country should retain its foreign name subject only to such modification as is necessary to conform to this code or to render it intelligible in English.
Page 28 - The use of such general terms as seedling, hybrid, pippin, pearmain, buerre, rare-ripe, damson, etc., is not admissible. G. The use of a possessive noun as a name is not admissible. H. The use of a number, either singly or attached to a word, should be considered only as a temporary expedient while the variety is undergoing preliminary test.