Planet Google: One Company's Audacious Plan to Organize Everything We Know (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Sep 23, 2008 - Business & Economics - 288 pages
34 Reviews
Based on unprecedented access he received to the highly secretive "Googleplex," acclaimed New York Times columnist Randall Stross takes readers deep inside Google, the most important, most innovative, and most ambitious company of the Internet Age. His revelations demystify the strategy behind the company's recent flurry of bold moves, all driven by the pursuit of a business plan unlike any other: to become the indispensable gatekeeper of all the world's information, the one-stop destination for all our information needs. Will Google succeed? And what are the implications of a single company commanding so much information and knowing so much about us?

As ambitious as Google's goal is, with 68 percent of all Web searches (and growing), profits that are the envy of the business world, and a surplus of talent, the company is, Stross shows, well along the way to fulfilling its ambition, becoming as dominant a force on the Web as Microsoft became on the PC. Google isn't just a superior search service anymore. In recent years it has launched a dizzying array of new services and advanced into whole new businesses, from the introductions of its controversial Book Search and the irresistible Google Earth, to bidding for a slice of the wireless-phone spectrum and nonchalantly purchasing YouTube for $1.65 billion.

Google has also taken direct aim at Microsoft's core business, offering free e-mail and software from word processing to spreadsheets and calendars, pushing a transformative -- and highly disruptive -- concept known as "cloud computing." According to this plan, users will increasingly store all of their data on Google's massive servers -- a network of a million computers that amounts to the world's largest supercomputer, with unlimited capacity to house all the information Google seeks.

The more offerings Google adds, and the more ubiquitous a presence it becomes, the more dependent its users become on its services and the more information they contribute to its uniquely comprehensive collection of data. Will Google stay true to its famous "Don't Be Evil" mantra, using its power in its customers' best interests?

Stross's access to those who have spearheaded so many of Google's new initiatives, his penetrating research into the company's strategy, and his gift for lively storytelling produce an entertaining, deeply informed, and provocative examination of the company's audacious vision for the future and the consequences not only for the business world, but for our culture at large.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
13
4 stars
13
3 stars
8
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Planet Google: One Company's Audacious Plan To Organize Everything We Know

User Review  - Lucas - Goodreads

The book is really short but covers a lot of area, there is only slightly more information here than would have been gleaned by an average person living through the same time period while using the ... Read full review

Review: Planet Google: One Company's Audacious Plan To Organize Everything We Know

User Review  - Pierre Lauzon - Goodreads

This books gives a lot of the early history of Google and the development of its search algorithms. It also talks about several of Google's forays into other areas such as Gmail and attempting to scan ... Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

Introduction
1
Open and Closed
21
Unlimited Capacity
47
The Algorithm
63
Moon Shot
89
GooTube
109
Small World After All
129
A Personal Matter
153
Algorithm Meet Humanity
179
Conclusion
195
Notes
201
Acknowledgments
259
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Randall Stross writes the New York Times column Digital Domain and is professor of business at San Jose State University. He is the author of several critically acclaimed books, including The Wizard of Menlo Park, eBoys, and The Microsoft Way. He lives in Burlingame, California.

Bibliographic information