An introduction to algebra: being the first part of a Course of mathematics, adapted to the method of instruction in the American colleges (Google eBook)

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H. Howe, 1827 - Algebra - 332 pages
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Page 190 - But it is commonly necessary that this first proportion should pass through a number of transformations before it brings out distinctly the unknown quantity, or the proposition which we wish to demonstrate. It may undergo any change which will not affect the equality of the ratios ; or which will leave the product of the means equal to the product of the extremes.
Page 124 - ... the product of the two, plus the square of the second. In the third case, we have (a + b) (a 6) = a2 b2. (3) That is, the product of the sum and difference of two quantities is equal to the difference of their squares.
Page 31 - MULTIPLYING BY A WHOLE NUMBER is TAKING THE MULTIPLICAND AS MANY TIMES, AS THERE ARE UNITS IN THE MULTIPLIER.
Page 188 - : b : : mx : y, For the product of the means is, in both cases, the same. And if na : b : : x : y, then a : b : : x :ny. 375. On the other hand, if the product of two quantities is equal to the product of two others, the four quantities...
Page 87 - MULTIPLY THE QUANTITY INTO ITSELF, TILL IT is TAKEN AS A FACTOR, AS MANY TIMES AS THERE ARE UNITS IN THE INDEX OF THE POWER TO WHICH THE QUANTITY IS TO BE RAISED.
Page 137 - In the same manner, it may be proved, that the last term of the square of any binomial quantity, is equal to the square of half the co-elficient of the root of the first term.
Page 295 - The operation consists in repeating the multiplicand, as many times as there are units in the multiplier.
Page 292 - After remarking that the mathematician positively knows that the sum of the three angles of a triangle is equal to two right angles...
Page 49 - As the value of a fraction is the quotient of the numerator divided by the denominator, it is evident, from Art.
Page 233 - Divide the first term of the dividend by the first term of the divisor, and write the result as the first term of the quotient. Multiply the whole divisor by the first term of the quotient, and subtract the product from the dividend.

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