M. T. Cicero de Oratore: Or, His Three Diaglogues Upon the Character and Qualifications of an Orator (Google eBook)

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R. P. & C. Williams, Cornhill Square, 1822 - Oratory - 296 pages
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Page 297 - ... for our purpose, we should have no occasion for having recourse to the rules of art. But since the passions of the soul, which are to be chiefly expressed or represented by action, are often so confused as to be quite obscured and almost obliterated, the causes of this obscurity must be dispelled, and advantage must be taken of those that are most unclouded and accessible. For nature has given every passion its peculiar expression in the look, the voice, and the gesture ; and the whole frame,...
Page 30 - Is there any thing so commanding, so grand, as that the eloquence of one man should direct the inclinations of the people, the consciences of judges, and the majesty of senates? Nay, farther, can aught be esteemed so great, so generous, so public-spirited, as to assist the suppliant, to rear the prostrate, to communicate happiness, to avert danger, and to save a fellowcitizen from exile ? Can...
Page 180 - And the objects that are most easily .played upon, are those who are neither worthy of the greatest detestation, nor the greatest compassion. Hence it happens, that the whole subject of the ridiculous lies in the moral vices of men who are neither beloved nor miserable, nor deserving to be dragged to, punishment for their crimes : when these qualities are gently handled, they are laughed at.
Page 128 - ... civil society, love of the public, nature, morals. At least, though he is not obliged to answer distinctly, like a philosopher, on these subjects, yet he surely ought to know how to interweave them dextrously in his pleading; he ought to speak on such...
Page 298 - ... has its different keys, so every voice is sharp, full, quick, slow, loud, or low, and each of these keys have different degrees, which beget other strains, such as the smooth, and the sharp, the contracted and lengthened, the continued and interrupted, the broken and divided, the tender, the shrill, and the swelling ; all these require to be managed with art and discretion. And the orator makes use of them, as the painter does of his colors, to give variety to his piece.
Page 132 - III. Finally, I require in the exordium clearness, justness, correctness, purity of language and style ; in a word, I may say perfection. In respect to ideas and style, the exordium * CICERO, De Oratore, lib. i., cap. xxvi. (Translation : London, 1808.) f CICERO, De Oratore, lib. ii., cap. xix. " As to the maxims which they lay down with regard to exordiums and narratives, these, according to them, are to obtain alike in all speeches.
Page 58 - ... as is too commonly the case, such a man I think deserves not reproof only, but punishment; for I have often observed in you what I have experienced in myself: I grow pale at the beginning of a speech, and feel a tremor in every part of my frame. But when a young man, I was so intimidated, that (I speak it with the highest sense of gratitude) Q. Maximus adjourned the court, when he perceived me thus oppressed and disabled with concern."* We prescribe the same rule but not as a rule of art.
Page 297 - For as a musical instrument has its different keys, so every voice is sharp, full, quick, slow, loud or low, and each of these keys have different degrees, which beget other strains, such as the smooth and the sharp, the contracted and lengthened, the continued and interrupted, the broken and divided, the tender, the shrill and the swelling ; all these require to be managed with art and discretion, and the orator makes use of them as the painter does of his colors...
Page 30 - ... must not only admire, but look upon as the just object of the most indefatigable pursuit. And now, to mention the chief point of all, what other power could have been of sufficient efficacy to bring together the vagrant individuals of the human race; to tame their...
Page 21 - ... perfection in eloquence quence unattainable ; and it is shameful to despair, when it is possible to succeed. CHAP. VIII. OF MUSIC AND ITS EXCELLENCY. Now I may rest my opinion upon that of the ancients. Every one knows that in former ages, music, that I may begin with it, was not only studied but adored, and its professors were esteemed prophets and sages. Were not Orpheus and Linus (to name no more) believed to be descended of the gods? And it is told of the first of these, that he not only...

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