“The” End of Capitalism (as We Knew It): A Feminist Critique of Political Economy ; with a New Introduction (Google eBook)

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U of Minnesota Press, 2006 - Social Science - 299 pages
3 Reviews
Why does the future (not to mention the present) seem to offer no hope of escape from capitalism? Ironically, the author argues, it is not the economic discourse of the right but primarily the socialist and Marxist traditions that have constituted capitalism as large, powerful, active, expansive, penetrating, systematic, self-reproducing, dynamic, victorious, and capable of conferring identity and meaning. What this has meant for left politics is the continual deferral of anticapitalist projects of social transformation and noncapitalist initiatives of economic innovation, since these presumably would have little chance of success in the face of a predominantly or exclusively capitalist economy. In this book J. K. Gibson-Graham explores the possibility of more enlivening modes of economic thought and action, outside and beyond the theory and practice of capitalist reproduction.
  

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Crucial to understanding the shifting place of capitalism in our shockingly non-capitalist society.

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Just arrived in the mail. I can't wait!!! Read full review

Contents

Chapter
18
An Encounter in Contradiction
24
How Do We Get Out of This Capitalist Place?
72
The Economy Stupid Industrial Policy Discourse
92
Chapter 6
120
Toward a New Class Politics of Distribution
174
Chapter 9
206
Ghosts on a Blackboard
238
Chapter 11
251
Bibliography
266
Index
286
Copyright

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Page xvii - The conclusion would be that the political, ethical, social, philosophical problem of our days is not to try to liberate the individual from the state, and from the state's institutions, but to liberate us both from the state and from the type of individualization which is linked to the state. We have to promote new forms of subjectivity through the refusal of this kind of individuality which has been imposed on us for several centuries.
Page xvi - ... double bind', which is the simultaneous individualization and totalization of modern power structures. The conclusion would be that the political, ethical, social, philosophical problem of our days is not to try to liberate the individual from the state, and from the state's institutions, but to liberate us both from the state and from the type of individualization which is linked to the state.

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About the author (2006)

J. K. Gibson-Graham is the pen name of Julie Graham and Katherine Gibson. Graham is Professor of Geography at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Gibson is Senior Fellow of Human Geography at Australian National University. Stephen A. Resnick and Richard D. Wolff are both Professors of Economics at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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