If not now, when?

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Simon & Schuster, Apr 1, 1985 - Fiction - 349 pages
50 Reviews
The winner of the Viareggio and Campiello prizes, this novel recounts the adventures of a band of Jews--former Soviet soldiers and concentration camp survivors--who battle the retreating German army in the closing days of World War II

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Really important, kind of difficult to read. - Goodreads
Primo Levi is such an amazing writer. - Goodreads
absolutely stunning writer. - Goodreads
I did like the ending though. - Goodreads

Review: If Not Now, When?

User Review  - Lyndsey - Goodreads

A fascinating account of the Second World War from the perspective of Russian-Jewish partisans. Read full review

Review: If Not Now, When?

User Review  - Virtuella - Goodreads

Deeply moving and full of humanity. An excellent novel. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
19
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Primo Levi was born on July 31, 1919 in Turin, Italy. He pursued a career in chemistry, and spent the early years World War II as a research chemist in Milan. Upon the German invasion of northern Italy, Levi, an Italian Jew, joined an anti-fascist group and was captured and sent to the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland. He was able to survive the camp, due in part to his value to the Nazis as a chemist. After the war ended, Levi did chemistry work in a Turin paint factory while beginning his writing career. His first book, If This Is a Man (title later was changed to Survival in Auschwitz) was published in 1947 and its sequel, The Truce (later retitled The Reawakening) came out in 1958. These two books recount Levi's story of surviving concentration camp life. Levi also published poetry, short stories, and novels, some under the pen name Damianos Malabaila. His 1985, largely autobiographical work, The Periodic Table, cemented his world fame. Awards in tribute to his writing included the Kenneth B. Smilen fiction award, presented by the Jewish Museum in New York. Ironically, despite his surviving Auschwitz, Primo Levi appears to have died by suicide, in Turin on April 11, 1987.

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