The Little Lawyer; Or, The Farmers', Mechanics', Miners', Laborers', and Business Men's Adviser and Legal Help: Containing a Concise Statement of the Manner of Making Statutory Laws, and the Manner of Putting Them in Practice; Together with Practical Forms of Complaints in All Ordinary Suits at Law, and Forms for Mechanics', Miners' and Laborers' Liens ... Together with the New Constitution of the State of California (Google eBook)

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A.L. Bancroft, 1880 - Commercial law - 328 pages
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Page 46 - I do solemnly swear, (or affirm, as the case may be,) that I will support the constitution of the United States,, and the constitution of the State of California; and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of the office of according to the best of my ability.
Page 2 - Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house; thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his man-servant, nor his maid-servant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor anything that is thy neighbor's.
Page 12 - No senator or representative shall, during the time for which he shall have been elected, be appointed to any civil office of profit under this State, which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during such term, except such offices as may be filled by elections by the people.
Page 39 - All property in the State, not exempt under the laws of the United States, shall be taxed in proportion to its value, to be ascertained as provided by law. The word " property," as used in this article and section, is hereby declared to include moneys, credits, bonds, stocks, dues', franchises, and all other matters and things", real, personal, and mixed, capable of private ownership...
Page 75 - Courts; also, in all cases at law which involve the title or possession of real estate, or the legality of any tax, impost, assessment, toll, or municipal fine, or in which the demand, exclusive of interest, or the value of the property in controversy, amounts to three hundred dollars...
Page 151 - All valuable mineral deposits in lands belonging to the United States, both surveyed and unsurveyed, are hereby declared to be free and open to exploration and purchase, and the lands in which they are found to occupation and purchase, by citizens of the United States and those who have declared their intention to become such, under regulations prescribed by law, and according to the local customs or rules of miners in the several mining districts, so far as the same are applicable and not inconsistent...
Page 6 - Private property shall not be taken or damaged for public use without just compensation having been first made to, or paid into Court for, the owner, and no right of way shall be appropriated to the use of any corporation other than municipal until full compensation therefor be first made in money or ascertained and paid into Court for the owner, irrespective of any benefit from any improvement proposed by such corporation, which compensation shall be ascertained by a jury, unless a jury be waived,...
Page 159 - That whenever by priority of possession rights to the use of water for mining, agricultural, manufacturing, or other purposes have vested and accrued and the same are recognized and acknowledged by the local customs, laws, and the decisions of courts, the possessors and owners of such vested rights shall be maintained and protected in the same...
Page 35 - The exercise of the right of eminent domain shall never be so abridged or construed as to prevent the Legislature from taking the property and franchises of incorporated companies and subjecting them to public use the same as the property of individuals, and the exercise of the police power of the State shall never be so abridged or construed as to permit corporations to conduct their business in such manner as to infringe the rights of individuals or the general well-being of the State.
Page 17 - The person having the highest number of votes shall be Governor; but, in case any two or more have an equal and the highest number of votes, the Legislature shall, by joint vote of both Houses, choose one of such persons so having an equal and the highest number of votes for Governor.

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