Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair

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Cornell University Press, 2001 - Philosophy - 204 pages
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Hilde Lindemann Nelson focuses on the stories of groups of people—including Gypsies, mothers, nurses, and transsexuals—whose identities have been defined by those with the power to speak for them and to constrain the scope of their actions. By placing their stories side by side with narratives about the groups in question, Nelson arrives at some important insights regarding the nature of identity. She regards personal identity as consisting not only of how people view themselves but also of how others view them. These perceptions combine to shape the person's field of action. If a dominant group constructs the identities of certain people through socially shared narratives that mark them as morally subnormal, those who bear the damaged identity cannot exercise their moral agency freely.Nelson identifies two kinds of damage inflicted on identities by abusive group relations: one kind deprives individuals of important social goods, and the other deprives them of self-respect. To intervene in the production of either kind of damage, Nelson develops the counterstory, a strategy of resistance that allows the identity to be narratively repaired and so restores the person to full membership in the social and moral community. By attending to the power dynamics that constrict agency, Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair augments the narrative approaches of ethicists such as Alasdair MacIntyre, Martha Nussbaum, Richard Rorty, and Charles Taylor.
  

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Contents

Reclaiming Moral Agency
1
Narrative Approaches to Ethics
36
Chapters The Narrative Construction of Personal Identities
69
Identities Damaged to Order
106
Counterstories
150
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About the author (2001)

James and Hilde Lindemann Nelson have both been associated with the Hastings Center, a private research institution concerned with ethical issues in health care. They are the co-authors of "The Patient in the Family: An Ethics of Medicine and Families. Both are now at the University of Tennessee, where James is a Professor of Philosophy teaching bioethics and Hilde is Director of the Center for Applied and Professional Ethics.

Hilde Lindemann is Professor of Philosophy at Michigan State University. A former editor of Hypatia and The Hastings Center Report, she is the author of a number of books, including An Invitation to Feminist Ethics and Damaged Identities, Narrative Repair.

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