Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Chas. Alexander, 1838
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Page 47 - Tis that which we all see and know." Any one better apprehends what it is by acquaintance than I can inform him by description. It is indeed a thing so versatile and multiform, appearing in so many shapes, so many postures, so many garbs, so variously apprehended by several eyes and judgments, that it seemeth no less hard to settle a clear and certain notion thereof than to make a portrait of Proteus, or to define the figure of the fleeting air. Sometimes it lieth in pat allusion to a known story,...
Page 101 - But Jesus said, Forbid him not : for there is no man which shall do a miracle in my name, that can lightly speak evil of me.
Page 146 - Now, if nature should intermit her course, and leave altogether though it were but for a while the observation of her own laws; if those principal and mother elements of the world, whereof all things in this lower world are made, should lose the qualities which now they have; if the frame of that heavenly arch erected over our heads should loosen and dissolve itself; if celestial spheres should forget their wonted motions, and...
Page 120 - The letter, as I live, with all the business I writ to his holiness. Nay then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness; And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting: I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more.
Page 337 - You may break, you may ruin the vase, if you will, But the scent of the roses will hang round it still.
Page 122 - And the king was much moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept: and as he went, thus he said, O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom!
Page 101 - Fear them not therefore: for there is nothing covered that shall not be revealed; and hid that shall not be known.
Page 45 - But there, where I have garner'd up my heart, Where either I must live, or bear no life ; The fountain from the which my current runs, Or else dries up...
Page 251 - ... are recovered, but a drunkard will never shake off the delight of beastliness ; for the longer it possesseth a man, the more he will delight in it ; and the older he groweth, the more he shall be subject to it ; for it dulleth the spirits and destroyeth the body, as ivy doth the old tree, or as the worm that engendereth in the kernel of the nut.
Page 207 - It ascends me into the brain, dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapours which environ it, makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble, fiery, and delectable shapes, which delivered o'er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.

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