The Talisman (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., 2005 - Fiction - 358 pages
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"For the love of the blessed Crown, most royal lady," said Edith-and Sir Kenneth, with feelings which it were hard to unravel, heard her prostrate herself at the Queen's feet -"for the love of our blessed Lady, and of every holy saint in the calendar, beware what you do!"-from The TalismanSir Walter Scott invented the historical novel... and the hunger among readers for sweeping tales of the distant past. This 1825 novel-a companion work to Scott's The Betrothed, of the same year-is an engrossing example of the genre he created, an historical melodrama of the 12th-century Crusades after the capture of Jerusalem by Saladin. Woven into the tale of rivalries among the Christian forces are secret identities, magical amulets, forbidden romance, an ailing king, and trial by combat. Forward thinking-this may be the first English-language novel to portray Muslims in a positive light-and exciting, Scott's fresh and lively prose and adventurous story continues to thrill readers in the 21st century.Scottish novelist and poet SIR WALTER SCOTT (1771-1832), a literary hero of his native land, turned to writing only when his law practice and printing business foundered. Among his most beloved works are The Lady of the Lake (1810), Rob Roy (1818), and Ivanhoe (1820).
  

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Contents

I
23
II
30
III
43
IV
66
V
79
VI
84
VII
95
VIII
108
XVI
198
XVII
204
XVIII
213
XIX
228
XX
240
XXI
254
XXII
262
XXIII
274

IX
120
X
134
XI
144
XII
163
XIII
171
XIV
180
XV
189
XXIV
284
XXV
298
XXVI
307
XXVII
319
XXVIII
337
Copyright

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Page 28 - But what was the surprise of the Saracen, when, dismounting to examine the condition of his prostrate enemy, he found himself suddenly within the grasp of the European, who had had recourse to this artifice to bring his enemy within his reach! Even in this deadly grapple the Saracen was saved by his agility and presence of mind. He unloosed the sword-belt, in which the Knight of the Leopard had fixed his hold, and, thus eluding his fatal grasp, mounted his horse, which seemed to watch his motions...
Page 25 - ... which they would otherwise have rendered intolerable to the wearer. The surcoat bore, in several places, the arms of the owner, although much defaced. These seemed to be a couchant leopard, with the motto, "I sleep wake me not." An outline of the same device might be traced on his shield, though many a blow had almost effaced the painting. The flat top of his cumbrous cylindrical helmet was unadorned with any crest. In retaining their own unwieldy defensive...
Page 27 - Christian knight, desirous to terminate this illusory warfare, in which he might at length have been worn out by the activity of his foeman, suddenly seized the mace which hung at his saddlebow, and, with a strong hand and unerring aim, hurled it against the head of the Emir, for such and not less his enemy appeared.
Page 26 - Leopard continued to fix his eyes attentively on the yet distant cluster of palm trees, it seemed to him as if some object was moving among them. The distant form separated itself from the trees, which partly hid its motions, and advanced towards the knight with a speed which soon showed a mounted horseman, whom his turban, long spear, and green caftan floating in the wind, on his nearer approach, proved to be a Saracen cavalier. " In the desert," saith an Eastern proverb, "no man meets a friend.
Page 7 - Crusaders,' would resemble the play bill which is said to have announced the tragedy of Hamlet, the character of the Prince of Denmark being left out.
Page 24 - ... there was also his triangular shield suspended round his neck, and his barred helmet of steel, over which he had a hood and collar of mail, which was drawn around the warrior's shoulders and throat, and filled up the vacancy between the hauberk and the head-piece.

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About the author (2005)

J. H. Alexander is senior lecturer in English at the University of Aberdeen.

G. A. M. Wood is senior lecturer in English at the University of Stirling.

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