Where Stuff Comes From: How Toasters, Toilets, Cars, Computers and Many Other Things Come To Be As They Are

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, Apr 13, 2005 - Social Science - 336 pages
3 Reviews
Molotch takes us on a fascinating exploration into the worlds of technology, design, corporate and popular culture. We now see how corporations, designers, retailers, advertisers, and other middle-men influence what a thing can be and how it is made. We see the way goods link into ordinary life as well as vast systems of consumption, economic and political operation. The book is a meditation into the meaning of the stuff in our lives and what that stuff says about us.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - name99 - LibraryThing

Another unexpected treat. I picked this up in the library on the assumption that it was a Henry Petroski type book about the history of everyday objects or suchlike; the publishers certainly have ... Read full review

Where stuff comes from: how toasters, toilets, cars, computers, and many others things come to be as they are

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The complicated, dynamic relationships between inventor, society, corporation, regulator, shopkeeper, community, family and customer is terrifically laid out by UC Santa Barbara and New York ... Read full review

References to this book

The Culture of Design
Guy Julier
Limited preview - 2007
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About the author (2005)

Harvey Molotch is professor of sociology and professor in the department of social and cultural analysis at New York University. His books include "Urban Fortunes: The Political Economy of Place" (with John Logan, California 2007) and "Where Stuff Comes From: How Toasters, Toilets, Cars, Computers and Many Other Things Come to Be as They Are" (Routledge 2005), winner of the Eastern Sociological Association's Best Book Award.

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