The London journal of arts and sciences (and repertory of patent inventions) [afterw.] Newton's London journal of arts and sciences (Google eBook)

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William Newton
1866
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Page 181 - All letters patent for inventions granted under the provisions hereinbefore contained shall be made subject to the condition that the same shall be void, and that the powers and privileges thereby granted shall cease and determine, at the expiration of three years and seven years respectively from the date thereof...
Page 45 - Ibs. of carbon ; a quantity which amounts to more than the weight of all the plants, and of all the strata of mineral and brown coal, which exist upon the earth. This carbon is, therefore, more than adequate to all the purposes for which it is required.
Page 181 - The provisional specifications filed in the office, and lapsed and forfeited, have also been printed and published in continuation. Printed certified copies of the specifications filed in the office, as also certified copies of patents, and of the record book of assignments of patents and licences, with copies of such assignments and licences, have been sent, in continuation, to the office of the Director of Chancery in Edinburgh, and the...
Page 179 - ... 120 per minute for tacks. In after practice the tack-machines were found to average about 80,000 tacks per day of 10 working hours, whilst the best hand workers could only produce from 1200 to 1400 per day. Each machine being tended by one youth (similar to those employed in hand making), it followed that one hand with the machine turned out as many tacks per day as would require over 60 working on the old plan with the hammer and anvil ; wherefore this labour-saving machine, of 60 for i, was...
Page 231 - August last, and the one face only which had been exposed, during more than three years, to the traffic of 9,550,000 engines, trucks, &c., and 95,577,240 tons, although evenly worn to the extent -of a little more than a quarter of an inch, still appeared to be capable of enduring much more work. A piece of one of these rails was exhibited, and another piece had been tested, by Mr.
Page 112 - Engineer for a period of four or five years' pupilage, or he may be placed in a mechanical workshop ; or he may be sent to one of our great universities, and any one of these courses may be the best under particular circumstances, such as local convenience, or as the social position of parents may dictate. It cannot be doubted that a period of twelve to twenty-four months may be very profitably spent in manufacturing works, before passing into a Civil Engineer's office ; but in that case the...
Page 104 - ... carrying out of works which may be thus enumerated : 1. Railways, roads, canals, rivers, and all modes of inland communication. 2. Water supply, gas-works, sewerage, and all other works relating to the health and convenience of towns and cities. 3. The reclamation, drainage, and irrigation of large tracts of country. 4. Harbours of refuge and of commerce, docks, piers, and other branches of hydraulic engineering. 5. Works connected with large mines, quarries, ironworks, and other branches...
Page 181 - ... subject to the condition that the same shall be void at the expiration of three years and seven years respectively from the date thereof, unless there be paid, before the expiration of the said three years and seven years respectively, the stamp duties in the schedule thereunto annexed, viz., 50/., at the expiration of the third year, and 100/. at the expiration of the seventh year. The patent is granted for 14 years.
Page 101 - On assuming the chair of this Institution as its President, and undertaking for the first time its duties and responsibilities, allow me to assure you that I feel deeply the honour you have conferred upon me by electing me to this, the highest position to which the civil engineer can aspire ; and that I feel still more deeply the weight of the duties which are inseparable from this honour. I will also venture earnestly to request you to extend to me your indulgence during my period of office, and...
Page 106 - ... obtained a large amount of preliminary information regarding the nature of all the materials employed upon engineering works, so as to enable him to select for his intended structures those materials which will be on the whole the most suitable ; having reference to efficiency, durability, and economy. I will now proceed to the question of the kind and degree of knowledge which is required to enable a young Engineer to proceed to...

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