Where Butterflies Grow

Front Cover
Lodestar Books, 1989 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 32 pages
12 Reviews
Readers take an imaginative journey into one of nature's wondrous processes--the transformation from caterpillar to black swallowtail butterfly. Full-color illustrations.

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Review: Where Butterflies Grow

User Review  - Olivia Rowley - Goodreads

This book would be a great book to read to a group of second graders learning the butterfly life cycle. It goes into detail about all the stages of the cycle and has amazing pictures to go along with it. Read full review

Review: Where Butterflies Grow

User Review  - Ruby - Goodreads

There are a lot of books on butterflies! This is the best one I have come across. Read full review

About the author (1989)

Joanne Ryder studied journalism at Marquette University. For several years she was an editor of children's books in New York, before she quit to write full-time. Ryder is an award-winning author whose books offer a unique blend of poetry and science. Her Just for a Day series invites children into the world of wild animals, ranging from a sea otter to Tyrannosaurus rex. Ryder's book, The Snail┐s Spell, won a New York Academy of Sciences Book Award. She has been named three times in the annual list of Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children by a joint committee of the Children┐s Book Council and the National Science Teachers Association.

Children's book illustrator and author Lynne Cherry was born on January 5, 1952, and grew up in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Encouraged by her parents at an early age to use her creative mind, Cherry wrote a book called Kitty's Adventures when she was just ten years old. As an adult Cherry reillustrated the book, while still keeping the original story, and published it as Archie, Follow Me. Cherry earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Tyler School of Art in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, in 1973. After graduating college, Cherry held a succession of jobs, including serving as artist-in-residence at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Maryland, acting as an historical consultant, organizing teacher-training conferences with The Center for Children's Environmental Literature, and doing illustrations for the Java History Trail Project. In 1986, Cherry went to Yale University to get her Master of Arts degree in history, in part so that she could successfully write a children's book about the environment. The finished book, which Cherry entitled A River Ran Wild, was named a Notable Children's Trade Book in the Field of Social Studies and a Children's Choice Book by a CBC/International Reading Association committee. Cherry's book, The Snail's Spell, was awarded the 1983 New York Academy of Sciences Children's Book Science Award, and her book The Great Kapok Tree was named an Outstanding Science Trade Book by the Children's Book Council and the National Science Teachers Association.

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