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Books Books 1 - 10 of 30 on She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people in general, she proportioned....  
" She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people in general, she proportioned them to the number of her ideas : and of the few syllables that did escape her, not one fell to the share of Miss Dashwood, whom she eyed with the spirited determination... "
Sense and Sensibility - Page 335
by Jane Austen - 2008 - 364 pages
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Sense and Sensibility and Persuasion ...

Jane Austen, Nancy Hale - 1864 - 522 pages
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words ; for, unlike people...eyed with the spirited determination of disliking Tier at all events. Elinor could not now be made unhappy by this behaviour. A few months ago it would...
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Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen - 1864 - 340 pages
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity , by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people...that did escape her, not one fell to the share of MissDashwood, whom she eyed with the spirited determination of disliking her at all events. Elinor...
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The Novels of Jane Austen: Sense and sensibility

Jane Austen - 1892
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words ; for, unlike people...determination of disliking her at all events. Elinor could not notu be made unhappy by this behaviour. A few months ago it would have hurt her exceedingly ; but it...
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The Novels of Jane Austen: Sense and sensibility

Jane Austen - English fiction - 1892
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people...determination of disliking her at all events. Elinor could have given her immediate relief by suggesting the possibility of its being Miss Morton's mother, rather...
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Sense and Sensibility, Volume 2

Jane Austen - 1899
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words ; for, unlike people...events. Elinor could not now be made unhappy by this behavior. A few months ago it would have hurt her exceedingly; but it was not in Mrs. Ferrars's power...
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The Oxford Point of View, Volume 2

1903
...excellent; and so too is chapter xxxiv, and more especially the conversation after dinner. Mrs. Ferrars " was not a woman of many words ; for, unlike people...she proportioned them to the number of her ideas." " No poverty of any kind, except of conversation, appeared ; but there the deficiency was considerable....
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The Novels and Letters of Jane Austen, Volume 2

Jane Austen - 1906
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people...by this behaviour. A few months ago it would have [94] hurt her exceedingly ; but it was not in Mrs Ferrars's power to distress her by it now ; and the...
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The Novels and Letters of Jane Austen, Volume 2

Jane Austen - 1906
...countenance from the disgrace of insipidity, by giving it the strong characters of pride and ill-nature. She was not a woman of many words; for, unlike people...by this behaviour. A few months ago it would have [94] hurt her exceedingly ; but it was not in Mrs Ferrars's power to distress her by it now ; and the...
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National Floodmarks: Week by Week Observations on American Life as Seen by ...

Mark Sullivan - Essays - 1915 - 391 pages
...as EDWARD'S mother at Lady MIDDLETON'S party?" One paragraph is enough for the full-length portrait: Mrs. FERRARS was a little thin woman, upright, even...she proportioned them to the number of her ideas. This quotation brings out the point we made in referring to JANE AUSTEN as greatest of the Little Masters....
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English Literature: an Introduction and Guide to the Best English Books: a ...

Edwin Lillie Miller - Authors, English - 1917 - 597 pages
...girl who is pleased that a man called and still more pleased that she missed him; of a woman of few words, for, unlike people in general, she proportioned them to the number of her ideas; of a newspaper item that interested nobody except those who knew its contents before; and of a man...
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