Sir Gawain and the Loathly Lady

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Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1985 - Juvenile Fiction - 28 pages
8 Reviews
After a horrible hag saves King Arthur's life by answering a riddle, Sir Gawain agrees to marry her and thus releases her from an evil enchantment.

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Review: Sir Gawain and the Loathly Lady

User Review  - Daniel Cracknell - Goodreads

'Sir Gawain and The Loathly Lady' begins with King Arthur becoming lost and finding himself defenseless before The Black Knight. The Black Knight soon challenges King Arthur to answer a riddle. King ... Read full review

Review: Sir Gawain and the Loathly Lady

User Review  - Jessica Bennett - Goodreads

I thought this was a really cute book. It taught a lesson but was well-written. I really enjoyed the illustrations. They supplemented the text and were very detailed and realistic. The "loathly lady ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Copyright

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About the author (1985)

Selina Hastings is a writer and journalist. She was educated at St Paul's Girls' School and Oxford University. Selina's first job was at Hatchards bookshop but she went on to work for fourteen years on the Daily Telegraph and for eight years as literary editor of Harper's & Queen. Hastings has been a lecturer and visting scholar at a number of foundations and was Mellon Fellow during 2002-2003 at the Harry Ransom Research Center, University of Texas. From 2008-2009 Selina was Royal Literary Fund Fellow at Queen Mary's University, London and in 2009-2010 she was awarded the Dorot Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellowship in Jewish Studies. Selina is the author of four literary biographies: Nancy Mitford, Evelyn Waugh (winner of the Marsh Biography Prize), Rosamond Lehmann and Somerset Maugham. She has also written a number of books for children. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, she reviews regularly and has been a judge of the Booker, Whitbread, British Academy, Ondaatje and Duff Cooper Prizes, and of the UK Biographers' Award.

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