Never Too Late: A 90-Year-Old’s Pursuit of a Whirlwind Life (Google eBook)

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Rowman & Littlefield, Sep 9, 2012 - Biography & Autobiography - 240 pages
5 Reviews

Libraries are filled with volumes containing recipes for growing old gracefully. Most of them are based on mountains of research and statistics. Career correspondent and author Roy Rowan read many of these books, and found in them some good advice.

 

Never Too Late is no such manual. It is simply one man’s views of the pleasures and potentials of old age based on a long life of adventure as a correspondent for the world’s leading magazines—and the lessons learned along the way from diverse groups of people, from the world’s most powerful leaders to some of the world’s most hapless individuals.

Rowan interweaves quotes from experts in gerontology and other sage writers with his own experiences and insights. He addresses a spectrum of topics, including the subjectivity of the label “old,” the importance of optimism, and the fight to maintain independence as the years go by. He also encourages retirees to start a second career or activity, naming the Three E’s of Enthusiasm, Exertion, and Energy as the keys to pursuing a new passion.

  

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Review: Never Too Late: A 90-Year-Old's Pursuit of a Whirlwind Life

User Review  - Katie Mac - Goodreads

Lots of valuable lessons that are applicable as a post grad. Dare to push your limits and become a master in your field. Read full review

Review: Never Too Late: A 90-Year-Old's Pursuit of a Whirlwind Life

User Review  - Janet - Goodreads

How old would you be if you didn't know how old you are? -Satchel Paige Read full review

Contents

1 How Old Is Old?
1
2 Quit Is a FourLetter Word
10
3 R Is for Resilience
25
4 Sunny Side Up
37
5 Tuned to the Immune System
50
6 You and the Eureka Factor
63
7 Stay in Touch
85
8 Seeking Solitude
103
10 Looking Ahead
134
11 Recycling the Past
141
12 Reliving the Dream
164
13 Finally a Feeling of Closure
184
14 Cruising into the Nineties
199
Back Flap
229
Back Cover
230
Spine
231

9 Looking Back
117

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About the author (2012)

** As a foreign correspondent, bureau chief, editor and writer Rowan spent 35 years with Life, Time, and Fortune magazines. He spent 15 of those years in Asia covering the Mao’s revolution in China, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War (and was evacuated from Saigon on one of the last helicopters in 1975). He also covered Communist uprisings in Malaysia and Burma and spent three years covering the Cold War in Europe.

** He is a recipient of the 2006 Henry R. Luce Lifetime Achievement Award from Time Inc.

** As a senior writer for Fortune, Rowan wrote more than 70 major articles, including a three-part series on the Hunt brothers during the 1980 silver crisis. In 1983 he wrote a cover story on the Top 50 Mafia Bosses in America. In January1990 he spent two weeks living on the streets of New York as a homeless man for a 10-page article in People. His bylined articles have also appeared In Time, Life (of which he was Assistant Managing Editor 1961-9), Smithsonian, the Atlantic, Readers’ Digest, The New Republic, and AARP the Magazine.

** Rowan has been a guest on many TV shows including: The Today Show, CBS Morning News, Nightline, Moneyline, A&E’s Open Book, C-Span, The Open Mind, and Larry King Live. He was the “cover story” on Charles Kuralt’s Sunday Morning Show broadcast from China on May 14, 1989. He served as a speaker aboard the QE-2 on two cruises.

** During World War II Rowan served in the U.S. Army in New Guinea and the Philippines, holding all ranks from Private to Major. He received the Bronze star medal. Immediately after the war he signed on as a transportation officer with United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRRA) in Henan Province in Central China, where he operated a fleet of 400 trucks.

** Born in New York City on February 1, 1920, Rowan attended Dartmouth College, graduating with a BA in 1941 and with an MBA from Dartmouth’s Amos Tuck School in 1942. He received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from Hartwick College in 1995, after serving as a trustee for nine years.

 

 

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