The town register: Marlboro, Troy, Jaffrey, Swanzey, 1908 (Google eBook)

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The Mitchell-Cony co., inc., 1908 - Jaffrey (N.H.) - 216 pages
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Page 2 - Turner has been arranged herewith in families where that arrangement has been possible. In these families, in addition to the resident living members, the names of the non-resident members are included. It should be borne in mind that this plan does not include the names of all former residents of this town as the names of the non-residents appear only when one or both the parents are still living in the town.
Page 9 - River and up the same to the farthest head thereof, and from thence northwestward, until sixty miles from the mouth of the harbor were finished ; also, through Merrimack river to the farthest head thereof, and so forward up into the land westward until sixty miles were finished ; and from thence to cross overland to the end of the sixty miles accounted from...
Page 9 - Merrimack river to the farthest head thereof, and so forward up into the land westward until sixty miles were finished ; and from thence to cross overland to the end of the sixty miles accounted from Pascataqua River ; together with all Islands within five leagues of the coast.
Page 2 - Following the names of the population is the occupation. To designate the occupations we have used the more common abbreviations and contractions. Some of these follow: Farmer — far; carpenter — car; railroad service — RR ser; student, a member of an advanced institution of learning — stu; pupil, a member of a lower grade of schools...
Page 2 - Folio wing the names of the population is the occupations. To designate these we have used the more common abbreviations and contractions, as follows: Farmer — far; carpenter — car; railroad service — RR ser; student, a member of an advanced institution of learning — stu; pupil, a member of a lower grade of schools (including all who have reached the age of five years)— pi; housework...
Page 2 - ... maker — mkr; worker — wkr; work — wk; shoe shop work — shoe op; cotton or woolen mill operatives —mill op; weaver— weav; spinner— spin; electrician— elec; painter— ptr; carriage work— car wk; dress maker— dr mkr; insurance — ins; traveling salesman, or commercial traveler — sales, or coml trav; music teacher — mus tr; teamster — team; general work — genlwk; mariner — mar; employ — emp; retired — retd.
Page 2 - It should be borne in mind that this plan does not include the names of all former residents of this town, as the names of the non-residents appear only when one or both of the parents are still living in the town. After the name of each non-resident will be found the present address, when such address has been given to us. Non-residents are indicated by the (*). When a daughter in a family has married, her name taken in marriage appears after her given name in parenthesis, the name preceded by a...
Page 55 - ... descendants. Northeast of the centre of the township, three more Turners, Solomon, Joseph, and Thomas, were among the first to fell the trees in those parts. Four Caldwells came to town. It is supposed that they also were from Londonderry but they had lived for a time in Peterborough, where one of them taught school. John Borland, first a farmer and afterward a miller, made a clearing near the place that WE Nutting now owns. William Smiley became a neighbor of Grout on the shore of Gilmore pond....
Page 55 - ... became a neighbor of Grout on the shore of Gilmore pond. Hugh Dunlap's land joined Grout's on the west. Near by was Joseph Hodge who gave to Hodge pond its name. Main Street, Showing Library and Bank. He it was who killed a catamount when he came on a prospecting trip to the township. Where Eleazer W. Heath now lives, John Gilmore made a cabin. This was the most thickly settled part of the town. In the extreme southeast, near Grout's former settlement, Ephraim Hunt from old Concord built a mill,...
Page 54 - ... have heard to the northeast the crash of falling trees. Soon after, Matthew Wright from the same place made a clearing where the farm of Charles W. Fasset now is, within a mile of Grout's door. Francis Wright, his son, settled near so offended him that he left town. William Mitchell, another Scot, settled on the farm now of William McCormack. James Nichols, John Swan and Thomas Walker, George Wallace and Robert Weir were among the first to arrive. William Turner settled on the Baldwin place,...

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