Multiculturalism (Expanded paperback edition) (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, Aug 22, 1994 - Philosophy - 192 pages
7 Reviews

A new edition of the highly acclaimed book Multiculturalism and "The Politics of Recognition," this paperback brings together an even wider range of leading philosophers and social scientists to probe the political controversy surrounding multiculturalism. Charles Taylor's initial inquiry, which considers whether the institutions of liberal democratic government make room--or should make room--for recognizing the worth of distinctive cultural traditions, remains the centerpiece of this discussion. It is now joined by Jürgen Habermas's extensive essay on the issues of recognition and the democratic constitutional state and by K. Anthony Appiah's commentary on the tensions between personal and collective identities, such as those shaped by religion, gender, ethnicity, race, and sexuality, and on the dangerous tendency of multicultural politics to gloss over such tensions. These contributions are joined by those of other well-known thinkers, who further relate the demand for recognition to issues of multicultural education, feminism, and cultural separatism.

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Review: Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition

User Review  - Cat - Goodreads

One of those books everyone should read. Read full review

Review: Multiculturalism: Examining the Politics of Recognition

User Review  - Matey - Goodreads

Taylor has displayed some very strong arguments. His main idea that we need to preserve cultures and their identity by acknowledging their worth could have, in my opinion, a very wide application ... Read full review

Contents

Part Two
105
Contributors
165

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About the author (1994)

Charles Taylor is Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at McGill University; K. Anthony Appiah, Professor of Afro-American Studies and Philosophy at Harvard University; Jurgen Habermas, Professor of Philosophy at Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt am Main; Steven C. Rockefeller, Professor of Religion at Middlebury College; Michael Walzer, Permanent Member of the Faculty at the School of Social Sciences at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton; Susan Wolf, Professor of Philosophy at The Johns Hopkins University; and Amy Gutmann, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Director of the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University.

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