General Chemistry (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Nov 24, 2014 - Science - 992 pages
14 Reviews

"An excellent text, highly recommended." — Choice
When it was first published, this first-year chemistry text revolutionized the teaching of chemistry by presenting it in terms of unifying principles instead of as a body of unrelated facts. Those principles included modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. In addition, Dr. Pauling attempted to correlate the theories with descriptive chemistry, the observed properties of substances, to introduce the student to the multitude of chemical substances and their properties.
In this extensively revised and updated third edition, the Nobel Prize–winning author maintains an excellent balance between theoretical and descriptive material, although the amount of descriptive chemistry has been decreased somewhat, and the presentation of the subject, especially in relation to the nonmetals, has been revised in such a way as to permit greater correlation with the electronic structure of atoms, especially electronegativity.
The principles of quantum mechanics are discussed on the basis of the de Broglie wavelength of the electron. The quantized energy levels of a particle in a box are derived by means of a simple assumption about the relation of the de Broglie waves to the walls of the box. No attempt is made to solve the Schrodinger wave equation for other systems, but the wave functions of hydrogen-like electrons are presented and discussed in some detail, and the quantum states for other systems are also covered. Statistical mechanics is introduced before thermodynamics, and the discussion of thermodynamics is based on it. This arrangement reflects the author's belief that beginning students can understand statistical mechanics better than chemical thermodynamics.
Aimed at first-year college students who plan to major in chemistry or closely related fields, the book is written in a logical, clear and understandable style. In addition, many excellent figures are included, along with numerous problems and 75 pages of appendixes covering such topics as symmetry of molecules and crystals, hybrid bond orbitals, and magnetic properties of substances.

  

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Review: General Chemistry

User Review  - Eliot Parulidae - Goodreads

Still useful after all these years. Read full review

Review: General Chemistry

User Review  - Chid Beacon - Goodreads

this book will help me in my studies especially learning my chemistry. Read full review

Contents

CLXXXII
632
CLXXXIII
636
CLXXXIV
637
CLXXXV
639
CLXXXVI
640
CLXXXVII
643
CLXXXVIII
644
CLXXXIX
645
CCXXXVII
753
CCXXXVIII
755
CCXXXIX
759
CCXL
764
CCXLI
765
CCXLII
767
CCXLIII
769
CCXLIV
770

CXC
646
CXCI
648
CXCII
650
CXCIII
654
CXCIV
655
CXCVI
659
CXCVII
662
CXCVIII
663
CXCIX
665
CC
666
CCI
667
CCII
670
CCIII
671
CCIV
674
CCV
678
CCVI
679
CCVII
681
CCVIII
686
CCIX
690
CCX
692
CCXII
693
CCXIII
697
CCXIV
698
CCXV
699
CCXVI
701
CCXVII
703
CCXVIII
704
CCXIX
711
CCXX
712
CCXXII
713
CCXXIII
715
CCXXIV
719
CCXXV
722
CCXXVI
723
CCXXVII
725
CCXXVIII
727
CCXXIX
729
CCXXX
733
CCXXXI
736
CCXXXII
739
CCXXXIII
740
CCXXXIV
743
CCXXXV
744
CCXXXVI
749
CCXLV
781
CCXLVI
789
CCXLVII
791
CCXLVIII
796
CCXLIX
797
CCL
802
CCLI
803
CCLII
805
CCLIII
809
CCLIV
813
CCLV
814
CCLVI
819
CCLIX
822
CCLX
824
CCLXI
825
CCLXII
829
CCLXIII
831
CCLXIV
833
CCLXV
837
CCLXVII
839
CCLXVIII
841
CCLXIX
843
CCLXX
845
CCLXXI
854
CCLXXII
856
CCLXXIII
859
CCLXXIV
865
CCLXXV
868
CCLXXVI
869
CCLXXVII
881
CCLXXVIII
895
CCLXXIX
898
CCLXXX
906
CCLXXXI
912
CCLXXXII
916
CCLXXXIII
917
CCLXXXIV
919
CCLXXXV
921
CCLXXXVI
924
CCLXXXVII
928
CCLXXXVIII
939
CCLXXXIX
942
CCXC
943
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Page 20 - the law of simple multiple proportions.* This law states that when two elements combine to form more than one compound, the weights of one element that combine with
Page 1 - atomic weight varies because of natural variations in the isotopic composition of the element. The observed ranges are boron, ± 0.003; carbon, ± 0.00005; hydrogen, ± 0.00001; oxygen. ±0.0001; silicon, ±0.001; sulfur, ±0.003. ¿The atomic weight is believed to have an experimental uncertainty of the following magnitude: bromine, ± 0.002; chlorine, ±0.001; chromium, ±0.001; iron, ± 0.003; silver. ±0.003. For other elements the last digit given is believed to be reliable to

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About the author (2014)

Linus Pauling: Two-Time Nobel Laureate
In 1985 Dover reprinted Introduction to Quantum Mechanics with Applications to Chemistry, a well-known older book by Linus Pauling and E. Bright Wilson. This book had been first published fifty years earlier and remarkably still found readers in 1985, and still does today, twenty-five years further on.

The first edition of Pauling's General Chemistry was a short book of less than 250 pages published in 1944, during World War II. Three years later, it had more than doubled in size to almost 600 pages, and the 1953 edition was over 700 pages. Fifteen years later, for the 1970 edition, it reached its final size and configuration at almost 1,000 pages ― and that is the edition which Dover reprinted in 1988. Dr. Pauling's one request at that time was that we keep the price affordable for students.

Linus Pauling is of course the only Dover author to win two Nobel prizes, for Chemistry in 1954 and for Peace in 1962; he is the only winner in history of two unshared Nobel Prizes.

In the Author's Own Words:
"Satisfaction of one's curiosity is one of the greatest sources of happiness in life."

"Do unto others 20% better than you would expect them to do unto you, to correct for subjective error."

"The way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas, and throw the bad ones away."

"Facts are the air of scientists. Without them you can never fly." — Linus Pauling

Critical Acclaim for General Chemistry:
"An excellent text, highly recommended." — Choice

Bibliographic information