Xenophon's Anabasis: books I.-IV (Google eBook)

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Allyn and Bacon, 1889 - 564 pages
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Page 160 - A (13 x 10), the most important MS. of the Iliad. The introduction gives a very good summary of the results of investigations of modern scholars as to the origin and mode of transmission of the Homeric poems ; and, though necessarily brief, it will yet inform the student of what many quite recent text-books of the Iliad do not, that there is such a thing as "the Homeric question," and impart some idea of its nature and the different answers which have been given to it. The sections on the structure...
Page 321 - Now whosoever of them did eat the honey-sweet fruit of the lotus, had no more wish to bring tidings nor to come back, but there he chose to abide with the lotus-eating men, ever feeding on the lotus, and forgetful of his homeward way.
Page 160 - College, Ohio. — Keep's Iliad is evidently superior to any edition now in use, and we have voted to adopt it for our classes. The introductory matter is valuable, and includes a satisfactory outline of the Homeric forms ; the notes are scholarly, graceful, and suggestive ; and the whole work reveals the hand of the experienced and enthusiastic teacher. Prof. Charles F. Smith, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Term.
Page 88 - Lydia proper was bounded on the north by Mysia, on the east by Phrygia, on the south by Caria, and on the west by the ^Egean sea.
Page 393 - Beiträge zur geographischen Erklärung des Rückzuges der Zehntausend durch das Armenische Hochland.
Page 160 - Homeric question," and impart some idea of its nature and the different answers which have been given to it. The sections on the structure and scansion of Homeric verse, on the dialect of Homer, and the commentary generally, show a nice appreciation of what a student needs and ought to have. Altogether the book is very handsome and very scholarly, and we have no doubt will prove very useful. (October 18, 1883...
Page 160 - Facing the titlepage is a beautiful fac-simile of a page oi the Codex Venetus A (13 x 10 inches), the most important MS. of the Iliad. The introduction gives a very good summary of the results of investigations of modern scholars as to the origin and mode of transmission of the Homeric Poems ; and, though necessarily brief, it will yet inform the student...
Page 267 - t . . . ßacriXf'a : ' if you had not come, we should be marching against the king;' the messengers from Ariaeus came just as the Greeks were starting. G.
Page 15 - I think fastened to a fallacy, and the other to a fiction. Instruction is but a very small part of education, and I refuse to put the part for the whole. Cyrus said he had only been taught three things ; to ride, to draw the bow, and to speak the truth. Yet it is certain that Cyrus was admirably well educated to lead and govern men. And I maintain that, if education be properly directed to its right object, the formation of character, and if you give it time enough, it is perfectly in the power of...
Page 160 - ... dialect of Homer, and the commentary generally, show a nice appreciation of what a student needs and ought to have. Altogether the book is very handsome and very scholarly, and we have no doubt will prove very useful. (October 18, 1883.) Professor JACOB COOPER, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, NJ — No college edition of Homer has appeared, either in this or any other country, in the last twenty years, that shows a superior knowledge of what is needed in the classroom.

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