Without Consent Or Contract: The Rise and Fall of American Slavery

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1994 - History - 539 pages
1 Review
"[Fogel's] exceedingly careful testing of all possible sources and his pioneering methodological approach have allowed [him] both to increase our knowledge of an institutions operation and disintegration and to renew our methods of research." --from the citation to Robert William Fogel for the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences

Over the past quarter-century, Robert William Fogel has blazed new trails in scholarship on the lives of the slaves in the American South. Now he presents the dramatic rise and fall of the "peculiar institution," as the abolitionist movement rose into a powerful political force that pulled down a seemingly impregnable system.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

With its virtual monopoly of raw cotton, the Confederacy could have risen to become a dominant world power. A small "sales tax" of $.05 on cotton would put the cost burden on foreign and northern ... Read full review

Contents

Discoveries and Dilemmas
9
THE IDEOLOGICAL AND POLITICAL CAMPAIGN
199
to the Abolitionist Crusade
238
Breaching
281
Forging a Victorious
320
The Moral Problem of Slavery
388
Acknowledgments
418
References
487
Index
525
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Robert William Fogel, winner of the 1993 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science, is director of the Center for Population Economics at the University of Chicago.

Bibliographic information