Roadside Geology of Wisconsin

Front Cover
Mountain Press Pub., 2004 - Science - 345 pages
4 Reviews
Robert H. Dott, Jr. and John W. Attig wrote Roadside Geology of Wisconsin to help residents and visitors alike envision mastodons roaming in front of glaciers 12,000 years ago, feel storm waves pounding sea cliffs 500 million years ago, and hear volcanoes exploding 1,900 million years ago. With lively prose, detailed maps, black-and-white photographs, and shaded-relief images, the authors succeed in their goal, unraveling the 2,800 million years of geologic history recorded in Wisconsin's rocks. Introductory sections describe the geology of each region, and thirty-five road guides locate and interpret the rocks, sediments, and landforms visible from the state's highways, including the Great River Road in the Mississippi Valley. Roadside Geology of Wisconsin delves further into the geologic history of specific sites such as Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, the Wisconsin Dells, the geologically renowned Baraboo Hills, and more than twenty-five state parks. Features of and access points to the Ice Age National Scenic Trail are noted.

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What people are saying - Write a review

Very interesting book

User Review  - barneydonna - Overstock.com

I was surprise how detail this book really is. Information such as this can not be found very easy through google just way too many interesting areas broken down in smaller sections of Wisconsin Read full review

Review: Roadside Geology of Wisconsin (Roadside Geology Series) (Roadside Geology Series #10)

User Review  - William - Goodreads

Features some interesting locations. Omits many of my own favorites, which is probably a blessing in disguise. Read full review

Contents

Northern Highlands
35
Road Guides
59
SuperiorHurley
81
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

John W. Attig is a transplanted New Englander who misses the ocean and mountains. He pursued his interest in glacial and Quaternary geology while a graduate student at the University of Maine at Orono (M.S., 1974) and the University of Wisconsin (Ph.D., 1984). Since 1981 he has been affiliated with the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and is presently a professor at the University of Wisconsin.

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