Observations, Anecdotes, and Characters, of Books and Men (Google eBook)

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John Murray, 1820 - Authors, English - 302 pages
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Page 133 - That's very strange ; but. if you had not supped, I must have got something for you. Let me see, what should' I have had ? A couple of lobsters; ay, that would have done very •well; two shillings; tarts, a shilling; but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket ?' ' No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Page 112 - One day, as the king was walking in the Mall, and talking with Dryden, he said, " If I was a poet, and I think I am poor enough to be one, I would write a poem on such a subject, in the following manner : " and then gave him the plan for it.
Page 134 - A couple of lobsters ; ay, that would have done very well ; two shillings — tarts, a shilling : but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket? — 'No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Page 136 - We were all at the first night of it, in great uncertainty of the event; till we were very much encouraged by overhearing the Duke of Argyle, who sat in the next box to us, say, 'it will do — it must do! — I see it in the eyes of them!
Page 10 - The next day, while I was heated with what I had heard, I wrote a letter to Mr. Addison to let him know that I was not unacquainted with this behaviour of his ; that if I...
Page 148 - Snch a post as that, and such a wife as the Countess, do not seem to be, in prudence, eligible for a man that is asthmatic, and we may see the day when he will be heartily glad to resign them both.
Page 129 - Prior was not a right good man. He used to bury himself, for whole days and nights together, with a poor mean creature, and often drank hard.
Page 19 - It was while I lived in the Forest, that I got so well acquainted with Sir William Trumbull, who loved very much to read and talk of the classics in his retirement. We used to take a ride out together, three or four days in the week, and at last, almost every day.—Another of my earliest acquaintance was Walsh. I was with him at his seat in Worcestershire, for a good part of the summer of 1705, and showed him my Essay on Criticism in 1706.
Page 47 - P I endeavoured, (said he, smiling), in this poem, to collect all the beauties of the great epic writers into one piece : there was Milton's style in one part, and Cowley's in another; here the style of Spenser imitated, and there of Statius; here Homer and Virgil, and there Ovid and Claudian.
Page 62 - He observed, how well that would hit my case, if I were to imitate it in English. After he was gone, I read it over ; translated it in a morning or two, and sent it to the press in a week or fortnight after. And this was the occasion of my imitating some other of the satires and epistles afterwards.

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