Who wrote the Dead Sea scrolls?: the search for the secret of Qumran

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Scribner, Jan 16, 1995 - History - 446 pages
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After having researched the Dead Sea Scrolls for more than 30 years, Dr. Golb contends that they were not, as has been traditionally assumed, written by the Essenes or by any one sect, but were instead the work of various Jews who smuggled them out of Jerusalem's libraries in 70 A.D., before Romans attacked the city. 10 photos; 5 maps.

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User Review  - Avidhunter - LibraryThing

The scrolls have been the subject of unending fascination and controversy ever since their discovery in the Qumran caves beginning in 1947. Intensifying the debate, Professor Norman Golb now ... Read full review

Who wrote the Dead Sea scrolls?: the search for the secret of Qumran

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Contrary to scholarly consensus, Golb contends that, rather than being the product of sectarian scribes, the Dead Sea Scrolls were the work of individuals from many diverse groups and that they were ... Read full review

Contents

The Qumran Plateau
13
The Manuscripts of the Jews
43
A Paradigm Reconsidered
95
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

Michael O. Wise is professor of ancient languages at Northwestern College. Norman Golb is the first holder of the Rosenberger Chair in Jewish History and Civilization at the University of Chicago, and is a voting member of its Oriental Institute. John J. Collins and Dennis G. Pardee are members of the faculty at the University of Chicago.