The geographical, natural and civil history of Chili, tr. by an American gentleman [R. Alsop]. (Google eBook)

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1808
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Page ii - Longworth, of the said district, hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit: " The Trust, a comedy, in five acts, by Charles Breck," in conformity to the act of the congress of the United States...
Page 8 - Why wish to spread our martial name afar ? Crushed as we are by Fortune's cruel stroke, And bent beneath an ignominious yoke, 111 can our minds such noble pride maintain, While the fierce Spaniard holds our galling chain. Your generous fury here ye vainly show; Ah! rather pour it on th...
Page 9 - Leader still our present state demands, To guide to vengeance our impatient bands; Fit for this hardy task that Chief I deem, Who longest may sustain a massive beam: Your rank is equal, let your force be tried And for the strongest let his strength decide." The chieftains acquiesce in this proposal. The beam is produced, and of a size so enormous that the poet declares himself afraid to specify its weight. The first chieftains who engage in the trial support it on their shoulders five and six hours...
Page 106 - Kamtsehatdales, two pieces of dry wood, one of which they place upon another, and turn it in their hands until it takes fire, which is very soon. Besides dinner, supper and breakfast, they have every day without fail their luncheon, which consists of a little flour of parched corn, steeped in hot water in the morning, and in cold in the evening But they often deviate from this simple mode of living at the public entertainments, which they give each other on occasion of funerals, marriages, or any...
Page 282 - ... five or six hundred tons each, are employed, which are partly Chilian, partly Peruvian. These usually make three voyages in a year. They carry from Chili, wheat, wine, pulse, almonds, nuts, cocoanuts, conserves, dried meat, tallow, lard, cheese, sole-leather, timber for building, copper, and sundry other articles ; and bring back in return, silver, sugar, rice, and cotton.
Page 55 - Beyond all fuff' ranee my afflictions rife : Yet, though the tafk will agonize my foul, Of my fad ftory I will tell the whole ; Grief, thus inforc'd, my life's weak thread may rend> And in the killing tale my pangs may end.
Page 10 - O thirst of gold ! disease without a cure ! What toils thy persevering slaves endure ! Thou common vice, whose long, tenacious spell, The noblest energies of mind can quell ! Thy deadly charms the human soul unbind From Heaven, and let her drive before the wind.
Page 65 - And the fair form was ill prepared for speed ; For at her breast she bore her huddled son ; To fifteen months the infant's life had run : From our brave captive sprung the blooming boy, Of both his parents the chief pride and joy. The Negro carelessly his victim brought, Nor knew th' important prize his haste had caught.
Page 39 - From clashing clouds the mingled torrents gush, And rain and hail with rival fury rush. Bolts of loud thunder, floods of lightning rend The opening skies, and into earth descend.
Page 9 - But on your generous valor I depend, That all our country's woes will swiftly end. A Leader still our present state demands, To guide to vengeance our impatient bands; Fit for this hardy task that Chief I deem, Who longest may sustain a massive beam: Your rank is equal, let your force be tried And for the strongest let his strength decide.

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