Free to Choose: A Personal Statement (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Nov 26, 1990 - Business & Economics - 360 pages
153 Reviews
The international bestseller on the extent to which personal freedom has been eroded by government regulations and agencies while personal prosperity has been undermined by government spending and economic controls. New Foreword by the Authors; Index.
  

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Review: Free to Choose: A Personal Statement

User Review  - Stanley Arthur - Goodreads

This is arguably viewed as the best work of the two legendary free market economists from the University of Chicago "Chicago School" of economic theory, Milton and Rose Friedman. The so called ... Read full review

Review: Free to Choose: A Personal Statement

User Review  - Bader Alhashel - Goodreads

This is a very fascinating political economy book from a Nobel laureate and one of the major economists in the last century. The book presents the argument for free markets and libertarianism. The ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1 The Power of the Market
2 The Tyranny of Controls
3 The Anatomy of Crisis
4 Cradle to Grave
5 Created Equal
6 Whats Wrong with Our Schools?
7 Who Protects the Consumer?
8 Who Protects the Worker?
9 The Cure for Inflation
10 The Tide Is Turning
Back Matter
Back Cover
Spine
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

An influential leader in the field of economics, Milton Friedman had his humble beginnings in New York City, where he was born in 1912 to poor immigrants. Friedman was educated at Rutgers University. He went on to the University of Chicago to earn his A.M., and to Columbia University, where in 1946 he received his Ph.D. That same year he became professor of economics at the University of Chicago and remained there for 30 years. He was also on the research staff at the National Bureau of Economic Research from 1937-1981. Friedman's greatest work is considered to be A Theory of the Consumption Function, published in 1957. Other books include A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960, and The Optimum Quantity of Money and Other Essays. Friedman was awarded the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1976.

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