The Constitutional History of England from the Accession of Henry VII to the Death of George II, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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L. Baudry, 1827 - Constitutional history
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Page 497 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 426 - Moreover we have granted for us and our heirs, as well to archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, and other folk of holy Church, as also to earls, barons, and to all the commonalty of the land, that for no business from henceforth...
Page 4 - ... the matters to be established for the estate of the king and of his heirs, and for the estate of the realm and of the people, should be treated, accorded, and established in parliament, by the king, and by the assent of the prelates, earls, and barons, and the commonalty of the realm, according as had been before accustomed.
Page 448 - It is atheism and blasphemy to dispute what God can do; good Christians content themselves with His will revealed in His Word, so it is presumption and high contempt in a subject to dispute what a King can do, or say that a King cannot do this or that, but | rest in that which is the King's will revealed in his law.
Page 414 - What cause we your poor Commons have to watch over our privileges is manifest in itself to all men. The prerogatives of princes may easily and do daily grow; the privileges of the subject are for the most part at an everlasting stand. They may be by good providence and care preserved, but being once lost are not recovered but with much disquiet.
Page 486 - I hope I shall not be found to have the troubled fountain of a corrupt heart, in a depraved habit of taking rewards to pervert justice ; howsoever I may be frail, and partake of the abuses of the times.
Page 150 - I do declare that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, power, superiority, preeminence, or authority, ecclesiastical or spiritual, within this realm : So help me God.
Page 97 - Forasmuch as manifest sin, vicious, carnal and abominable living, is daily used and committed amongst the little and small abbeys, priories, and other religious houses of monks, canons, and nuns...
Page 3 - No man could be committed to prison but by a legal warrant specifying his offence ; and by an usage nearly tantamount to constitutional right, he must be speedily brought to trial by means of regular sessions of jail-delivery.
Page 432 - First, we hold it an ancient, general, and undoubted right of Parliament to debate freely all matters which do properly concern the subject and his right or state; which freedom of debate being once foreclosed, the essence of the liberty of Parliament is withal dissolved.

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