The Literary Magazine, and American Register, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Charles Brockden Brown
John Conrad & Company, 1804
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Page 401 - Latin rime being no necessary adjunct or true ornament of poem or good verse, in longer works especially, but the invention of a barbarous age, to set off wretched matter and lame metre ; graced indeed since by the use of some famous modern poets, carried away by custom, but much to their own vexation, hindrance, and constraint to express many things otherwise, and for the most part worse, than else they would have expressed them.
Page 263 - How blest is he who crowns, in shades like these, A youth of labour with an age of ease ; Who quits a world where strong temptations try, And since 'tis hard to combat, learns to fly...
Page 371 - Looking tranquillity! It strikes an awe And terror on my aching sight; the tombs And monumental caves of death look cold, And shoot a chillness to my trembling heart.
Page 361 - Taking the whole earth, instead of this island, emigration would of course be excluded; and, supposing the present population equal to a thousand millions, the human species would increase as the numbers 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and subsistence as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. In two centuries the population would be to the means of subsistence as 256 to 9; in three centuries as 4096 to 13 and in two thousand years the difference would be almost incalculable.
Page 402 - tis all one ; And when we can, with metre safe, We'll call him so ; if not, plain Ralph : (For rhyme the rudder is of verses, With which, like ships, they steer their courses) j An equal stock of wit and valour He had laid in, by birth a tailor.
Page 202 - That from beneath the seat of Jove doth spring; Begin, and somewhat loudly sweep the string. Hence with denial vain, and coy excuse ; So may some gentle Muse With lucky words favour my destined urn ; And as he passes turn, And bid fair peace be to my sable shroud.
Page 456 - French commander, fearing to trust him alone with them, remained until he could deliver him in safety into the hands of his master. " The savage approached his prisoner kindly, and seemed to treat him with particular affection. He offered him some hard biscuit ; but finding that he could not chew them, on account of the blow he had received from the Frenchman, this more humane savage soaked some of the biscuit in water, and made him suck the pulp-like part. Determined...
Page 394 - The following are the particular circumstances which give it this aspect. 1, The number of bones. 2. Their confused position. 3. Their being in different strata. 4. The strata in one part having no correspondence with those in another. 5. The different states of decay in these strata, which seem to indicate a difference in the time of inhumation. 6. The existence of infant bones among them.
Page 308 - Nobles and heralds, by your leave, Here lies what once was Matthew Prior, The son of Adam and of Eve ; Can Bourbon or Nassau claim higher ? " But, in this case, the old prejudice got the better of the old joke.
Page 313 - Nor motion of swift thought, less could his shield Such ruin intercept: ten paces huge He back recoil'd ; the tenth on bended knee His massy spear upstay'd; as if on earth Winds under ground or waters, forcing way Side-long had push'da mountain from his seat, Half sunk with all his pines.

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