Charles Dickens's works. Charles Dickens ed. [18 vols. of a 21 vol. set. Wanting A child's history of England; Christmas stories; The mystery of Edwin Drood]. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1868
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 94 - Flora, always tall, had grown to be very broad too, and short of breath ; but that was not much. Flora, whom he had left a lily, had become a peony ; but that was not much. Flora, who had seemed enchanting in all she said and thought, was diffuse and silly. That was much. Flora, who had been spoiled and artless long ago, was determined to be spoiled and artless now. That was a fatal blow. This is Flora! "I am sure...
Page 522 - They went quietly down into the roaring streets, inseparable and blessed; and as they passed along in sunshine and in shade, the noisy and the eager, and the arrogant and the froward and the vain, fretted, and chafed, and made their usual uproar.
Page 65 - Whatever was required to be done, the Circumlocution Office was beforehand with all the public departments in the art of perceiving HOW NOT TO DO IT.
Page 501 - Be guided only by the healer of the sick, the raiser of the dead, the friend of all who were afflicted and forlorn, the patient Master who shed tears of compassion for our infirmities.
Page 14 - That is to say," he coloured a little, " next to none that I can put in action now. Trained by main force ; broken, not bent ; heavily ironed with an object on which I was never consulted and which was never mine ; shipped away to the other end of the world before I was of age, and exiled there until my father's death there, a year ago ; always grinding in a mill I always hated ; what is to be expected from me in middle life? Will, purpose, hope? All those lights were extinguished before I could...
Page 25 - Its movables were ugly old chairs with wornout seats, and ugly old chairs without any seats ; a threadbare patternless carpet, a maimed table, a crippled wardrobe, a lean set of fire-irons like the skeleton of a set deceased, a...
Page 16 - In our course through life we shall meet the people who are coming to meet us, from many strange places and by many strange roads," was the composed reply ; " and what it is set to us to do to them, and what it is set to them to do to us, will all be done.
Page 300 - Papa is a preferable mode of address," observed Mrs. General. "Father is rather vulgar, my dear. The word Papa, besides, gives a pretty form to the lips. Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes, and prism, are all very good words for the lips : especially prunes and prism. You will find it serviceable, in the formation of a demeanour, if you sometimes say to yourself in company on entering a room, for instance Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, prunes and prism.
Page 80 - I know what I have seen, and what I have looked in the face, in this world here where I find myself. And I tell you this, my friend, that there are people (men and women both, unfortunately) who have no good in them none. That there are people whom it is necessary to detest without compromise. That there are people who must be dealt with as enemies of the human race. That there are people who have no human heart, and who must be crushed like savage beasts, and cleared out of the way.
Page 359 - ... on people in the soundest health, and become developed in the most unlikely constitutions ; is a fact as firmly established by experience as that we human creatures breathe an atmosphere. A blessing beyond appreciation would be conferred upon mankind, if the tainted, in whose weakness or wickedness these virulent disorders are bred, could be instantly seized and placed in close confinement (not to say summarily smothered) before the poison is communicable.

Bibliographic information