The Logs of the Serapis - Alliance - Ariel, Under the Command of John Paul Jones, 1779-1780: With Extracts from Public Documents, Unpublished Letters, and Narratives, and Illustrated with Reproductions of Scarce Prints (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Sanford Barnes
Printed for the Naval history society by the De Vinne press, 1911 - United States - 138 pages
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Page C-124 - I was unable to detach any of them from the strong convoy under which they sailed. I met with and brought too a variety of other Ships, none whereof proved British Property, except two Brigantines from Malaga with Fruit for London, which became Prizes, the one is arrived here, the other I am told in Quiberon Bay, as I have met with and brought too several Ships in the Night, I had the most agreeable Proofs of the Active Spirit of my Officers and Men. " I have forwarded my despatches to Paris, by...
Page C-126 - French lady (who was said to be a great connosieur in the art of cookery, and in hanging and arranging pictures in a room where the first companies went to dine) was gallanted on board by Captain Jones the evening before the day on which the company were to dine, and was by him directed to take upon herself the superintendence of the approaching feast.
Page C-124 - Curr' but since I am not certain that my Poetry will be understood, it may not be amiss to add, by way of marginal note, that after leaving Portsmouth nothing remarkable happened...
Page C-122 - I know you will not suspect me of flattery, when I affirm I have not experienced a more sincere pleasure, for a long time past, than the account I have have had of your having gained your cause at Philadelphia, in spite of party. Your late trouble will tend to your future advantage ; by pointing out your friends and enemies, you will be thereby enabled to...
Page C-126 - ... had been drawn by one of the most finished artists in France, and many of which were quite indecent, especially to meet the eyes of a virtuous woman. However in these days they were a part of French etiquette on such an occasion. The quarterdeck of our ship was covered with the most elegant carpet : the plate alone which was made use of on this singular occasion was estimated to be worth two thousand guineas. (For my own part I believe it might have been rated at double that sum.) French cooks...
Page C-125 - Situation happpy and Instructive, shall not be wanting. I must rely on you to make my best Compliments acceptable to the fair Miss Wendell, and to the other agreeable Ladies of my acquaintance in Portsmouth.
Page C-129 - We sounded now in thirty five fathoms of water. The sheet cable was now paid out to the bitter end : but she did not look to her anchor; and her cable was spliced to the first, and paid out to the bitter end; she did not yet bring up ; the third cable was also spliced to the end of the second ; when after paying out about...
Page C-130 - ... was more than his commission was worth, taking his head into the bargain, for him to order the departure of either of the ships under his command; more especially on such a piece of service as that was, which Captain Jones wished her to be sent upon. The fact was, this same French admiral was at the very time as deep in the mud as L was in the mire; and so was the commander of the citadel, commonly called Fort Lewis, or Louis. L had been to this last place sundry times, as well as on board of...

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