An Introduction to ther Geometry of Numbers (Google eBook)

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 16, 1996 - Mathematics - 344 pages
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Reihentext + Geometry of Numbers From the reviews: "The work is carefully written. It is well motivated, and interesting to read, even if it is not always easy... historical material is included... the author has written an excellent account of an interesting subject." (Mathematical Gazette) "A well-written, very thorough account ... Among the topics are lattices, reduction, Minkowski's Theorem, distance functions, packings, and automorphs; some applications to number theory; excellent bibliographical references." (The American Mathematical Monthly)
  

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Contents

II
1
III
9
IV
19
V
20
VI
23
VII
26
VIII
27
IX
30
XXXVII
184
XXXVIII
187
XXXIX
189
XL
194
XLI
198
XLII
201
XLIII
205
XLIV
207

X
35
XI
51
XII
60
XIII
64
XIV
68
XV
73
XVI
78
XVII
80
XVIII
84
XIX
98
XX
103
XXI
105
XXII
108
XXIII
119
XXIV
121
XXV
122
XXVI
126
XXVII
134
XXVIII
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XXIX
145
XXX
152
XXXI
155
XXXII
163
XXXIII
165
XXXIV
175
XXXV
178
XXXVI
181
XLV
213
XLVI
219
XLVII
223
XLVIII
228
XLIX
231
L
235
LI
240
LII
245
LIII
246
LIV
250
LV
256
LVI
266
LVII
268
LVIII
279
LIX
286
LX
295
LXI
298
LXII
301
LXIII
303
LXIV
309
LXV
313
LXVI
322
LXVII
332
LXVIII
334
LXIX
343
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Page 1 - We owe to MINKOWSKI the fertile observation that certain results which can be made almost intuitive by the consideration of figures in и-dimensional euclidean space have far-reaching consequences in diverse branches of number theory.

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About the author (1996)

Biography of J.W.S. Cassels

J. W. S. Cassels (known to his friends by the Gaelic form "Ian" of his first name) was born of mixed English-Scottish parentage on 11 July 1922 in the picturesque cathedral city of Durham. With a first degree from Edinburgh, he commenced research in Cambridge in 1946 under L. J. Mordell, who had just succeeded G. H. Hardy in the Sadleirian Chair of Pure Mathematics. He obtained his doctorate and was elected a Fellow of Trinity College in 1949. After a year in Manchester, he returned to Cambridge and in 1967 became Sadleirian Professor. He was Head of the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics from 1969 until he retired in 1984.

Cassels has contributed to several areas of number theory and written a number of other expository books:
- An introduction to diophantine approximations
- Rational quadratic forms
- Economics for mathematicians
- Local fields
- Lectures on elliptic curves
- Prolegomena to a middlebrow arithmetic of  curves of genus 2 (with E. V. Flynn).

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