The Secretary, and Complete Letter Writer: Containing a Collection of Letters Upon Most Occasions and Situations in Life. To which is Added, an Essay on Letter Writing (Google eBook)

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Knott & Lloyd, 1803 - Letter writing - 168 pages
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Page 93 - The greatest benefit which one friend can confer upon another, is to guard, and excite, and elevate his virtues. This your mother will still perform, if...
Page lvii - ... whole The first, last purpose of the human soul ; And knows where faith, law, morals, all began, All end, in love of God and love of man.
Page vii - Careless their merits, or their faults to scan, His pity gave ere charity began. Thus to relieve the wretched was his pride, And e'en his failings lean'd to virtue's side ; But in his duty prompt at every call, He watch'd and wept, he prayed and felt for all...
Page 143 - And the green turf lie lightly on thy breast : There shall the morn her earliest tears bestow, There the first roses of the year shall blow; While angels with their silver wings o'ershade The ground, now sacred by thy reliques made.
Page 74 - I am ignorant of any one quality, that is amiable in a man, which is not equally so in a woman : I do not except even modesty and gentleness of nature. Nor do I know one vice or folly, which is not equally detestable in both.
Page xv - Why form'd so weak, so little, and so blind? First, if thou canst, the harder reason guess, Why form'd no weaker, blinder, and no less?
Page 157 - Wherever we are studious to please, we are afraid of trusting our first thoughts, and endeavour to recommend our opinion by studied ornaments, accuracy of method, and elegance of style.
Page 144 - Burns's poems, and have read them twice ; and though they be written in a language that is new to me, and many of them on subjects much inferior to the author's ability, I think them on the whole a very extraordinary production.
Page 130 - It is the curse of kings, to be attended By slaves, that take their humours for a warrant To break within the bloody house of life ; And, on the winking of authority, To understand a law ; to know the meaning Of dangerous majesty, when, perchance, it frowns More upon humour, than advis'd respect.
Page 84 - Soon after I perceived that I had suffered a paralytic stroke, and that my speech was taken from me. I had no pain, and so little dejection in this dreadful state, that I wondered at my own apathy, and considered that perhaps death itself, when it should come, would excite less horror than seems now to attend it.

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