From the Soul: Stories of Great Black Parents and the Lives They Gave Us

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2001 - Family & Relationships - 243 pages
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From the Soul cuts away at the long-held stereotype that blacks can't parent. Instead, it celebrates great black parenting. This is a book that blacks have been yearning for, a work that honestly portrays the emotionally rich, intensely family-oriented experience of growing up black in America.

For a year and a half, Phyllis Harris interviewed black men and women about their memories of childhood. In particular, she wanted to capture their stories -- stories that depicted the black family as a source of enormous love, resilience, support, and understanding, celebrating their strength through the best and the worst of times. Here are the voices of the sons and daughters honoring the parents -- and grandparents -- who instilled in them the strong sense of self, confidence, and integrity that have been the foundation upon which they've built successful lives.

From the Soul is a unique tribute -- highly personal, candid, emotionally honest, and poignant -- to the power of family, in which all readers will be inspired to see themselves. Illustrated with wonderful family photographs, here is a book that no reader, regardless of ethnic background, will ever forget.

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From the soul: stories of great Black parents and the lives they gave us

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Little recent child-rearing literature focuses on African American parents and children. These two well-written works belong in all public libraries because they contribute substantially to filling ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
A Time for All Things
9
It Aint Nobodys Business What You Do
29
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Phyllis Y. Harris is an advocate for children and families. She began her career as a Dyson Fellow for the Children's Defense Fund in Washington, D.C. She was educated at Yale, the University of Paris, and East Carolina University.

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