Molecular Biology of the Cell

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1989 - Science - 1263 pages
36 Reviews
New edition of a text in which six researchers from leading institutions discuss what is known and what is yet to be understood in the field of cell biology. The material on molecular genetics has been revised and expanded so that it can be used as a stand-alone text. A new chapter covers pathogens, infection, and innate immunity. Topics include introduction to the cell, basic genetic mechanisms, methods, internal organization of the cell, and cells in their social context. The book contains color illustrations and charts; and the included CD-ROM contains dozens of video clips, animations, molecular structures, and high-resolution micrographs. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR.
  

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Review: Molecular Biology of the Cell

User Review  - Shantanu Sharma - Goodreads

One of the finest molecular biology textbooks I've ever read with detailed illustrations. Useful as a biology reference as well as for graduate-level courses. Read full review

Review: Molecular Biology of the Cell

User Review  - Rishi Kulkarni - Goodreads

This really drones on a bit and really just goes over concepts that can be found in any biochemistry textbook. What even IS molecular biology, anyway? Read full review

Contents

The Evolution of the Cell
3
The Differentiated State Can Be Modulated by a Cells The Behavior of a Hemopoietic Cell Depends Partly
4
Membranes Defined the First Cell
9
Special Features
16
Panel 12 Some of the different types of cells present in the vertebrate body 2425
24
Small Molecules Energy and Biosynthesis
41
Nucleotides Are the Subunits of DNA and
45
Panel 21 The chemical properties of water and their influence on the behavior of biological molecules 4647
46
Ciliary Movement
645
Dynein Is Responsible for the Sliding 648 Tension in the Actinrich Cortex May Help Drive
651
Cell Signaling
681
Panel 111 The polymerization of actin filaments
685
Cells in All Mammalian Tissues Continuously Release The Cyclic AMP and Ca2+ Pathways Interact
711
Transcription by Binding to Specific DNA Sequences 690 Summary
717
Receptor and Adenylate Cyclase Molecules Are A Cascade of Protein Phosphorylation Couples
723
Cell Growth and Division
727

Panel 24 An outline of some of the types of fatty acids commonly encountered in cells 5253
54
Summary
58
Food and the Derivation of Cellular
64
Amino Acids and Nucleotides Are Part of the Nitrogen
70
Biosynthesis Requires Reducing Power
77
Enzymes Can Be Switched On and Off by Covalent
84
Structure Shape and Information
87
Panel 27 pree energy and biological reactions
88
61
92
Table 33 The relationship between freeenergy differences and equilibrium constants
95
67
100
71
106
80
112
Protein Function 122 Negative Staining and Cryoelectron Microscopy Allow
124
Energydriven Changes in Protein Conformations
130
How Cells Are Studied
135
The Genomes of Mitochondria and Signal Peptides and Signal Patches Specify a Proteins
157
Protein Machines Play Central Roles in Many Specific Growth Factors
161
Proteins Can Be Separated by Chromatography
167
Images Can Be Enhanced and Analyzed by Electronic Summary
174
Recombinant DNA Technology 180 Nucleic Acid Sequences in Chromosomes and Cells
185
The Molecular Organization of Cells
199
In Eucaryotes Only One Species of Polypeptide Chain
214
Amino Acids Are Added to the CarboxylTerminal
220
Low Mutation Rates Mean That Related Organisms Viral Genomes Come in a Variety of Forms and
225
DNA Replication in the 5to3 Direction Allows Restriction Nucleases Facilitate the Cloning of Genes 258
231
Genes Can Be Redesigned to Produce Proteins of Any Desired Sequence 266
242
84
262
Viruses Are Mobile Genetic Elements 249 The Lipid Bilayer Is a Twodimensional Fluid
278
Table 63 Comparison of ion concentrations inside and outside a typical mammalian cell
301
the problem and its solution
308
The Lipid Bilayer Serves as a Solvent for Membrane Active Transport in Bacteria Can Occur by Group
311
in Detergents 286 PatchClamp Recording Indicates That Individual
318
Many Membrane Proteins Diffuse in the Plane of the There Are Two Pathways of Exocytosis
324
Membrane Transport Proteins Can Act as Carriers or The Contents of Endosomes End up in Lysosomes
331
86
336
An Asymmetrical Distribution of Carrier Proteins in Summary
337
The Citric Acid Cycle Oxidizes the Acetyl Group
347
The Rapid Conversion of ADP to ATP in Mitochondria
353
Spectroscopic Methods Have Been Used to Identify
359
The Light
368
In a Reaction Center Light Energy Captured
375
Summary
381
Organelle Growth and Division Maintain the Number Cells Cannot Construct Their Membranebounded
390
A Proteins Stability Can Be Determined by Enzymes
396
Panel 62 The derivation of the Nernst equation
407
specific Proteins 397 Nuclear Pores Perforate the Nuclear Double
422
The Compartmentalization of Higher Proteins Unfold as They Are Imported into the Mitochondrial Matrix
428
The Endoplasmic Reticulum 433 Apparatus by a Membranebound Receptor Protein
434
Ongoing Polypeptide Chain Elongation
440
Can Determine the Many Different Topologies Secretory Vesicles Bud from the Trans Golgi Network 465
448
Summary 474
454
Developmental Programs of Individual SegmentPolarity Genes Label the Basic Subdivisions
471
The Cell Nucleus
481
Chromosomal Proteins
483
Most Chromosomal DNA Does Not Code for Essential Heterochromatin Is Highly Condensed
486
The Association of Histones with DNA Leads to the RNA Synthesis and RNA Processing
523
Table 93 Selected data on amounts of RNA in a typical mammalian cell
531
Orderly Domains of Interphase Chromatin Can Also The Same RNA Transcript Can Be Processed
536
Ribosomal RNAs Are Made on Tandemly Arranged Most Enhancers and Upstream Promoter Elements
545
Control of Gene Expression
551
The Molecular Genetic Mechanisms
570
Could Specify a Large Number of Cell Types 554 Drosophila Genes Can Also Be Turned Off
578
Changes in Protein Phosphorylation Can Regulate DNA Methylation Reinforces Developmental Decisions
584
RNA Splicing Can Be Regulated to Produce Different CHAPTER
589
The Cytoskeleton
613
Proteins That Bind to the 5 Leader Region of mRNAs
617
Some mRNAs Are Localized to Specific Regions of the Other Acessory Proteins Maintain the Architecture
623
Tandemly Repeated DNA Sequences Tend to Remain Summary
629
Genomes and Increase Biological Diversity 607 Focal Contacts Allow Actin Filaments to Pull Against
635
Protein Kinase C 703 The Cell Cycle Is Most Easily Monitored in Culture
730
Calcium Ions 708 MPF Induces Mitosis in a Wide Variety of Cells
736
CellDivision Controls in Anaphase
743
Panel 112 The polymerization of microtubules 655
747
Multicellular Organisms 743 Kinetochore Microtubules Disassemble During
750
GrowthFactor Receptors 756 Tight Junctions Form a Permeability Barrier Across
756
Panel 131 The six stages of cell division 766767
766
Cell Adhesion Cell Junctions
791
Adhesion Is Not Understood 759
796
PART
797
The Permeability of Gap Junctions Is Regulated 800 Basal Laminae Perform Diverse and Complex
820
Proteoglycans Are Composed of Long Slime Mold Amoebae Aggregate by Chemotaxis
826
Highly Motile Cells Are Sensitive Detectors of Small
832
From Cells to Multicellular Organisms
837
Sexual Reproduction Helps to Keep a Diploid Species
842
Between Homologous Nonsister Chromatids
847
Figure 1518 The behavior of chromosomes during meiosis 852853
852
Cellular Mechanisms of Development
879
Able to Develop into a New Individual 855 Gastrulation Movements Are Organized Around
886
Differences Among Nonmammalian Blastomeres Often
892
Block to Polyspermy 872
898
That Generates the Nematode Cell Lineage 905 Homeotic Selector Gene Products Help to Regulate
907
Principles of Spatial Patterning 911 Regulated Through Differential Splicing as Well as by Transcriptional Controls 936
914
The Coordinated
940
Drosophila Begins Its Development as a Syncytium 921 Summary
946
Differentiated Cells and the Maintenance of Tissues
951
Signals from the Two Ends of the Drosophila
952
Some Structures Are Maintained by a Continuing Summary 983
953
Their Nerve Supply 953 Genesis Modulation and Regeneration
983
Duplication of Existing Endothelial Cells 963 Summary
989
of Different Keratins as They Mature 970 Summary
995
The Immune System
1001
CHAPTER
1002
Most Lymphocytes Continuously Recirculate
1007
An Antibody Molecule Is Composed of
1013
and H Chains Consist of Constant and Variable
1019
Imprecise Joining of Gene Segments Increases
1025
an Immunological Network
1031
T Lymphocytes and Cellmediated
1037
Association with Class I MHC Molecules
1043
Secreting Interferon
1049
The Nervous System
1059
some major principles
1067
The Nervous System Computation
1086
NonChannellinked Receptors Mediate Slow
1092
Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Are Important Intracellular
1098
The Neuromuscular Junction Is the Bestunderstood Photoreceptors Are Sensitive and Adaptable
1104
Synapses Are Major Targets for Drug Action 1085 The Character and Future Connections of a Neuron
1110
Each Axon or Dendrite Extends by Means of a Cellulose Microfibrils Are Crosslinked into
1120
of Embryonic Motor Neurons 1125 Interactions Between Plants
1131
Special Features of Plant Cells 1137
1139
Panel 192 Some classical experiments on the squid giant axon 106
1154
Special Features Golgi Vesicles Deliver CellWall Material to Specific
1165
The Organization of Cellulose Microfibrils
1168
Meristems Continually Produce New Organs and
1174
Plant Growth and Development Are Regulated
1180
Cancer
1187
Mutation and Natural Selection
1195
Both DNA Viruses and RNA Viruses Can Cause
1204
The Actions of Oncogenes Can Be Assayed
1210
Each Case of Cancer Represents a Separate
1216
List of Tables
1219
1030
1-3
1036
1-10
Apparatus to Lysosomes 459 Each DNA Molecule That Forms a Chromosome Must
1-13
1039
1-17
1041
1-23
Techniques 142
1-28
Copyright

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References to this book

Investigations
Stuart A. Kauffman
Limited preview - 2002
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About the author (1989)

Bruce Alberts is the President of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC and Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California at San Francisco.

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