Journal of the Royal Horticultural Society, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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Royal Horticultural Society., 1872 - Botany
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Vols. for 1869-1952 include Extracts from the proceedings of the Royal Horticultural Society.
  

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Page 5 - Ituziola) growing in deep water, and standing out of it 2 or 3 feet. The large male flowers, of the most delicate pink, streaked with deep purple, and with six long yellow stamens hanging out of them, were disposed in a lax terminal panicle ; while the slender green female flowers grew on the bristle-like branches of much smaller panicles springing from the inflated sheaths of the leaves that clothed the stem. As the Indians disturbed the grassy fringe with the movement of their paddles, the pollen...
Page 155 - ... and so on, till at length only a few species were left, and these not only persisted, but slowly gained ground from year to year, and ultimately remained in possession of the plot. The plots under observation were 2 metres 30 cents, long, 1 metre broad, and all as nearly as possible under the same conditions, save that the soil was varied, in some cases consisting of the ordinary soil of the garden, in others of an admixture of lime, in others of sand, or of sand and lime, and so forth. Of the...
Page 13 - I have noticed that a cross between a round white and a blue wrinkled pea, will in the third and fourth generations (second and third years produce) at times bring forth blue round, blue wrinkled, white round, and white wrinkled peas in the same pod, that the white round seeds when again sown, will produce only white round seeds, that the white wrinkled seeds will, up to the fourth or...
Page 95 - ... containing potash, and superphosphate of lime ; but the high price of salts of potash, and the uncertainty of the ' action of manures upon the crop, render the application of artificial manures for Clover a practice of doubtful economy. When land is what is called " clover-sick," none of the ordinary manures, whether " artificial," or natural, can be relied upon to secure a crop.
Page 8 - Wallace). In approaching one of these plants through the thick forest, the sense of hearing would perhaps give the first notice of its proximity, from the merry hum of winged Insects which its scented flowers had drawn together, to feast on the honey, and to transport the pollen of the male to the female plants; for it Is chiefly dloacious species of Palms that have such sweet flowers.
Page 90 - GROWTH OF RED CLOVER, YEAR AFTER YEAR, ON RICH GARDEN SOIL. In 1854, after it seemed clear that the plant would not continue to grow on the arable land, Clover was sown in a garden, only a few hundred yards distant from the experimental field, on soil which had been under ordinary kitchen-garden cultivation for probably two or three centuries. It is remarkable that, under these conditions, the crop has grown luxuriantly almost every year since; this year, 1889, being the 36th season of the continuous...
Page 115 - Illinois, and further south, they are all black, and in the intermediate region both black and yellow females occur in varying proportions. And the case is not open to any doubt, because in the intermediate district both yellow and black insects have been bred from the same batch of eggs. Now, if the case had been that...
Page 8 - Is chiefly dloacious species of Palms that have such sweet flowers. The absence of odoriferous flowers from the grasses seems to show that Insect-aid is not needed for effecting their fecundation, but does not render Its accidental concurrence a whit less unlikely.
Page 5 - December, 1849, when threading in my canoe among the islands of the Trombetas : — " This channel was lined on both sides by a beautiful grass — a species of Luziola — growing in deep water, and standing out of it two or three feet. The large male flowers, of the most delicate pink, streaked with deep purple, and with six long yellow stamens hanging out of them, were disposed in a lax terminal panicle; while the slender green female flowers...
Page 9 - Hence the conclusion Is unavoidable that in grasses, as In other plants, variations of surrounding conditions Induce corresponding modifications of structure, and that amongst the former must be enumerated cross marriages, however brought about. If the flowers of grasses be sometimes fertilized in the bud, it is probably exceptional, like the similar cases recorded of Orchids and many other families. To conclude : the more I ponder over existing evidence, the more I feel convinced that In its perfect...

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