From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 1890-1967

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Univ of North Carolina Press, 2000 - Political Science - 320 pages
2 Reviews
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, more Americans belonged to fraternal societies than to any other kind of voluntary association, with the possible exception of churches. Despite the stereotypical image of the lodge as the exclusiv
  

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Review: From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 1890-1967

User Review  - Jerrod - Goodreads

This is a nice overview of the history of fraternal orders in the US (with a few tidbits about English friendly societies tossed in). The book describes how individuals (via voluntary mutual aid ... Read full review

Review: From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State: Fraternal Societies and Social Services, 1890-1967

User Review  - Sean Rosenthal - Goodreads

Interesting Quote: "The shift from mutual aid and self-help to the welfare state has involved more than a simple bookkeeping transfer of service provision from one set of institutions to another. As ... Read full review

Contents

IV
5
V
17
VI
44
VII
63
VIII
87
IX
109
X
130
XI
143
XII
161
XIII
181
XIV
204
XV
222
XVI
235
XVII
291
XVIII
307
Copyright

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Page 1 - The tendency to join fraternal organizations for the purpose of obtaining care and relief in the event of sickness and insurance for the family in case of death is well-nigh universal. To the laboring classes and those of moderate means they offer many advantages not to be had elsewhere.

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About the author (2000)

David T. Beito is assistant professor of history at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

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