John Dalton and the rise of modern chemistry (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1895 - Chemistry - 216 pages
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Page 128 - While the particles continue entire, they may compose bodies of one and the same nature and texture in all ages; but should they wear away or break in pieces, the nature of things depending on them would be changed.
Page 128 - It seems probable to me that God in the beginning formed matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, moveable particles, of such sizes and figures, and with such other properties, and in such proportion to space, as most conduced to the end for which he formed them; and that these primitive particles being solids, are incomparably harder than any porous bodies compounded of them; even so hard, as never to wear or break in pieces; no ordinary power being able to divide what God himself made one in...
Page 150 - To obtain any adequate conception of their size we must betake ourselves to a scheme of threefold magnification. Lord Kelvin has shown that if a drop of water were magnified to the size of the earth the molecules of water would be of a size intermediate between that of a cricket ball and of a marble.
Page 129 - And therefore, that nature may be lasting, the changes of corporeal things are to be placed only in the various separations and new associations and motions of these permanent particles; compound bodies being apt to break not in the midst of solid particles, but where those particles are laid together and only touch in a few points.
Page 128 - All these things being considered, it seems probable to me that God in the beginning formed matter in solid, massy, hard, impenetrable, movable particles, of such sizes and figures, and with such other properties and in such proportion to space as most conduced to the end for which he formed them...
Page 136 - The different sizes of the particles of elastic fluids under like circumstances of temperature and pressure being once established, it became an object to determine :,, the relative sizes and weights, together with the relative ', number of atoms in a given volume. This led the way "!, to the combinations of gases, and to the number of atoms entering into such combinations, the particulars of which will be detailed more at large in the sequel.
Page 33 - Kendal we were intimately acquainted. Mr. Gough was as much gratified with imparting his stores of science as I was in receiving them. My use to him was chiefly in reading, writing, and making calculations and diagrams, and in participating with him in the pleasure resulting from successful investigations ; but, as Mr. Gough was above receiving any pecuniary recompense, the balance of advantage was greatly in my favour, and I am glad of having this opportunity of acknowledging it. It was he who first...
Page 66 - There can scarcely be a doubt entertained respecting the reducibility of all elastic fluids of whatever kind into liquids; and -we ought not to despair of effecting it in low temperatures, and by strong pressure exerted upon the unmixed gases.
Page 91 - I have succeeded better than many who surround me, in the different walks of life, it has been chiefly, nay, I may say almost solely, from unwearied assiduity. It is not so much from any superior genius that one man possesses over another, but more from attention to study and perseverance in the objects before them, that some men rise to greater eminence than others.
Page 129 - God is able to create Particles of Matter of several Sizes and Figures, and in several Proportions to Space, and perhaps of different Densities and Forces, and thereby to vary the Laws of Nature, and make Worlds of several sorts in several Parts of the Universe. At least, I see nothing of Contradiction in all this.

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