A History of the Mahrattas, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1826 - India
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Page 242 - After arriving at this height there is an immense craggy precipice of black rock upwards of 40 ft. high, and surmounting the whole is a strong stone wall with towers. The fort is of an irregular shape ; the exterior presents on all sides the stupendous barrier already mentioned, so that, except by the gates, entrance seems impossible. From the summit, when the atmosphere is clear, is seen to the E.
Page 459 - Whether it is durable or no I would have your Excellency consider, it is certain nothing in this world is durable, which if your Excellency does consider, the way of this world is well known.
Page 393 - Moguls advanced, he withdrew into the Fort, and rolled down huge stones from the rock above, which did great execution. The blockade, however, was complete, all communications were cut off, provisions were exhausted, and the besieged must have been compelled to surrender had not Parshuram Trimbak, who had thrown himself into the Fort of Prali, purchased the connivance of 'Azim Shah, and conveyed stores to the besieged.
Page 331 - Halls of audience for public assemblies and privy councils, with all the courts and cabinets attached to them, each hall magnificently adorned and having within it a raised seat or throne for the emperor, surrounded by gilded pillars with canopies of velvet, richly fringed and superbly embroidered, separate tents as mosques and oratories, baths, and galleries for archery and gymnastic exercises ; a seraglio as remarkable for luxury and privacy as that of Delhi ; Persian carpets damasks and tapestries,...
Page 170 - Gopinat to the camp of Afzool Khan. The latter represented Sivajee as in great alarm ; but if his fears could be overcome by the personal assurances of the Khan, he was convinced that he might easily be prevailed upon to give himself up. With a blind confidence, Afzool Khan trusted himself to Puntojee's guidance. An interview was agreed upon, and the Beejapoor troops, with great labour, moved to Jowlee. Sivajee prepared a place for the meeting, below the fort of Pertabgurh ; he cut...
Page 331 - Halls of audience for public assemblies and privy councils, with all the courts and cabinets attached to them, each hall magnificently adorned, and having within it a raised seat or throne for the Emperor, surrounded by gilded pillars with canopies of velvet, richly fringed, and superbly embroidered ; separate tents, as mosques and oratories ; baths ; and galleries for archery and gymnastic exercises ; a seraglio as remarkable for luxury and privacy as that of Dehli.
Page 493 - A deceitful calm,' says the historian of Muharashtra, ' succeeded ; the fall of the rain brought back the cheering ' green ; and the beautiful province of Goozerat, which, for ' hundreds of miles, may vie with the finest parks of the nobles ' of England, was clothed, in all its natural beauties, by rapid ' verdure and luxuriant, vegetation. Tranquillity seemed to ' reign, where, a short time before, nothing was to be seen but ' perpetual skirmishing ; murder and robbery in open day ; ' caravans...
Page 331 - ... general splendour. The entrance into the royal enclosure was through a spacious portal, flanked by two elegant pavilions, from which extended, on each side, rows of cannon, forming an avenue, at the extremity of which was an immense tent containing the great State drums, and imperial band ; a little farther in front was the post of the grand guard on duty, commanded by a nobleman, who mounted with it daily. On the other sides, surrounding the great enclosure just mentioned, were separate...
Page 171 - Sivajee had made preparations for his purpose, not as if conscious that he meditated a criminal and treacherous deed, but as if resolved on some meritorious though desperate action. Having performed his ablutions with much earnestness, he laid his head at his mother's feet and besought her blessing.
Page 461 - ... me for that end concerning the liberty of your people I am to assure you my intent is cordially the same. It is therefore necessary that some person of character intervene, and act as guarantee between us to whom I will presently send your Excellency's people. Your Excellency will afterwards do the like by mine. The prisoners on both sides, having by this means obtained their liberty, afterwards we shall enter on what relates to our friendship and treaty of peace for the avoidance of prejudice...

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