Life of Joseph Brant: (Thayendanegea) Including the Border Wars of the American Revolution, and Sketches of the Indian Campaigns of Generals Harmar, St. Clair, and Wayne, and Other Matters Connected with the Indian Relations of the United States and Great Britain, from the Peace of 1783 to the Indian Peace of 1795, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Munsell, 1865 - Indians of North America
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Page 46 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it. I have killed many ; I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 56 - I am afraid my uncle will think himself justified by them on this occasion, when he asserts, that it is one of the most difficult things in the world to put a woman right, when she sets out wrong.
Page 46 - I APPEAL to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not? During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, - Logan is the friend of the white men.
Page 456 - These are inflicted by assemblies and committees, who dare to profess themselves friends to liberty, upon the most quiet subjects, without distinction of age or sex, for the sole crime, often for the sole suspicion, of having adhered in principle to the government under which they were born, and to which, by every tie, divine and human, they owe allegiance.
Page 230 - Animated by these considerations, at the head of troops in the full powers of health, discipline and valor ; determined to strike where necessary, and anxious to spare where possible, I by these presents invite and exhort all persons, in all places where the progress of this army may point; and by the blessing of God I will extend it far to maintain such a conduct as may justify me in protecting their lands, habitations and families.
Page 36 - Thucydides and have studied and admired the master states of the world that for solidity of reasoning, force of sagacity, and wisdom of conclusion, under such a complication of difficult circumstances, no nation or body of men can stand in preference to the general congress at Philadelphia.
Page 456 - The messengers of justice and of wrath await them in the field; and devastation, famine, and every concomitant horror that a reluctant but...
Page 204 - Upward of one hundred men, women, and children have perished by the hands of the ruffians to whom, it is asserted, you have paid the price of blood.
Page 426 - Containing 98 of farmers, killed in their houses ; hoops red ; figure of a hoe, to mark their profession ; great white circle and sun, to show they were surprised in the day-time ; a little red foot, to show they stood upon their defence, and died fighting for their lives and families.
Page 427 - FATHER! We have only to say further, that your traders exact more than ever for their goods; and our hunting is lessened by the war, so that we have fewer skins to give for them. This ruins us. Think of some remedy. We are poor, and you have plenty of everything. We know you will send us powder and guns and knives and hatchets; but we also want shirts and blankets.

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