The No-nonsense Guide to World History

Front Cover
Verso, 2001 - History - 144 pages
15 Reviews
When it comes to world history, battles in tiny corners of Europe and the love affairs of kings often obscure the big picture. The No-Nonsense Guide to World History integrates concisely the conventional narratives of dynastic politics and wars with the stories of the continents and communities, the great civilizations of Asia, Africa and Latin America, and the history of women, that are often missing from standard history texts.
  

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Review: The No-Nonsense Guide to World History (No-Nonsense Guides)

User Review  - Jonathan Mitchell - Goodreads

A fantastic little 40,000-word book! If reading about world history has always seemed like a vast, inhospitable undertaking, fret no longer--Chris Brazier has made it not only digestible but enjoyable ... Read full review

Review: The No-Nonsense Guide to World History (No-Nonsense Guides)

User Review  - duck reads - Goodreads

A quick sketch of world history from primordial slime and microorganisms to political slime, the war in Iraq, and global warming, it's given to sweeping assertions without showing its work, but what ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
8
In the beginning
10
Pharaohs and priestesses
17
Superpowers and barbarians
22
God and the spirit
27
Greek and Latin
32
The rise and rise of religion
39
Light in the East
46
The American way
81
The power and plenty of Asia
88
Liberie Engalite Fraternite
92
Revolution
97
Carving up the world
102
Total war
111
The power of the workers
114
Capitalism and Fascism
117

Wars of the cross
52
Glory and murder in the New World
60
The hidden continent
68
Shadow of the Sun King
76
The radical 20th century
124
chronology
137
Index
144
Copyright

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References to this book

The Synthesis
Nash Popovic
Limited preview - 2008
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About the author (2001)

Chris Brazier has been a co-editor of New Internationalist magazine since 1984. His previous publications include Vietnam: The Price of Peace and (as editor) Raging Against the Machine. Since 2001 he has also been principal writer for UNICEF's The State of the World's Children report.

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