The Chief Governors: The Rise and Fall of Reform Government in Tudor Ireland 1536-1588

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 6, 2002 - History - 344 pages
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This book offers an extended reinterpretation of English policy in Ireland over the sixteenth century. It seeks to show that the major conflicts between Tudor governors and native lords which characterised the period were not the result of a deliberate Tudor strategy of confrontation, but argues that they arose from a failed experiment in legal reform and cultural assimilation which had been applied with remarkable success elsewhere in the Tudor dominions. The book identifies a distinct administrative style which evolved in Irish government during the middle of the century under a complex set of pressures acting on the would-be reformers both in Ireland and at the Tudor court, and argues that it was this highly centralised and intensely activist mode of government that undermined the aims of reform policy and provoked alienation and hostility.
  

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Contents

Ireland in the wake of the Kildare rebellion 1536
1
The course of reform government 15361578
11
Reform as process the viceroyalties of Lord Leonard Grey and Sir Anthony St Leger 15361547
13
Ireland and the midTudor crisis 15471556
45
Reform by programme the viceroyalties of the earl of Sussex 15561565
72
Reform on contract the viceroyalties of Sir Henry Sidney 15661578
113
Government in Ireland 15361579
159
The impact of reform government 15561583
167
Reform government and the feudal magnates
169
Reform government and the community of the Pale
209
Reform government and Gaelic Ireland
245
Reform in crisis the viceroyalty of Sir John Perrot 15841588
291
Bibliography
301
Index
317
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