The Cambridge Modern History, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1908 - History, Modern
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

and James II
51
The year 1689 The question of a religious crusade
58
LIST OF BIBLIOGRAPHIES
60
FRENCH SEVENTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE
64
Influence on English literature Addison Pope Waller
70
The divine right of Kings Bossuet
76
CHAPTER V
92
The policy of Parliament Ecclesiastical legislation
98
Restrictions on Irish trade England and Spain
104
Effect of the Dutch War on England
110
Contents
113
CHAPTER VI
116
Paradise Regained
122
Samson Agnnistes
123
Sir George Etherege
129
Drydens religious poems
135
Negotiations for peace
141
Victories in the Baltic Peace of Copenhagen
147
The War of Devolution The Triple Alliance
153
CHAPTER VIII
168
2 The Wars 166474
178
The Four Days Battle
184
The Peace of Breda
189
De Ruyter and Rupert
195
Parliament and toleration
201
The Declaration of Indulgence Dutch negotiations
207
Divines on divorce Ministry of Danby
213
William marries Mary New treaty of Charles with Louis
219
THE REVOLUTION AND THE REVOLUTION SETTLEMENT
236
The Seven Bishops Invitation to William
242
Second flight of James
248
Locke and the Original Contract
254
2 Scotland from the Restoration to the Union of the Parliaments
278
The Pentland Rising Letters of Indulgence
284
Letters of Indulgence Execution of Renwick 200
290
The Darien Scheme and Expeditions Results of the failure 206
297
16601700
301
12
307
Schombergs campaign William in Ireland
313
Limerick capitulates Articles of civil and military treaties
319
Church and dissent under Tudors and Stewarts
325
The contest under Charles II Nonconformists and Roman
331
Toleration and Comprehension The Comprehension Bill dropped
337
CHAPTER XII
338
Poland and Transylvania George Rakoczy II
344
Election of Michael Wisniowiecki
350
France Poland and Austria
356
PAGE
361
Relief of Vienna
362
Continued defeats of the Turks
368
CHAPTER XIV
401
Marlborough in the Netherlands
407
Capture of Gibraltar Battle of Malaga j
413
Almanza Eugenes attempt on Toulon
419
Malplaquet
425
Marlborough the non plus ultra
431
The Peace of Utrecht
437
AngloFrench Treaty of Navigation and Commerce
443
Neuchatel Orange
449
Peace between Spain and the United Provinces
455
CHAPTER XV
460
The grand embassy to the west Revolt of the Strieltzy 623
524
Abolition of the Patriarchate
530
CHAPTER XVIII
558
Her dangers abroad and at home Early years of Charles XI 663
564
Swedish victory of Lund Other victories Losses in Germany
570
Character of Charles XI 672
572
Military and naval changes 678
578
CHAPTER XIX
584
Renewed RossoSaxon alliance The Baltic campaigns
590
Peter and the Powers Mazepa
596
Battle of Poltawa Second league against Sweden
602
The Maritime Powers offer mediation Stenbock in Pomerania
608
Death of Charles XII C14
614
CHAPTER XX
616
CHAPTER XXI
639
Cultivation and immigration
645
Battle of Fehrbellin
651
The Great Elector and William of Orange
654
Aspirations of Frederick III
660
and the Grand Alliance
666
Treaties of SaintGermain Fontainebleau and Lund
671
Results of his reign
672
Political disturbances Discovery of gold
678
Loss of the Spanish monopoly French colonisation North
684
System of colonial government
690
The Portuguese Dutch and English in India
695
Union of the New and Old Companies
701
Mathematical and Applied Science in the sixteenth century 7078
709
Development of Physics 7156
715
Physical Optics
721
Harvey
726
Stahls phlogiston theory
732
Mineralogy
738
The desire for intellectual freedom Calixtus
744
The Cambridge Platonists
750
Labadism and Quakerism
756
Wurtemberg Pietism Bogatzky
762
CHAPS PAGES I The Government of Louis XIV 16611715 76570
765
The Foreign Policy of Louis XIV 166197 7714
771
French Seventeenth Century Literature and its European Influence 7759
775
The Gallican Church 7805
780
England under Charles II and James II 166087 78698
788
The Literature of the English Restoration including Milton 799808
799
The administrations of John de Witt and William of Orange 165188 80914
809
The AngloDutch Wars 8158
815
The Revolution and the Revolution Settlement in Great Britain 81937
819
Toleration in England 8389
838
Austria Poland and Turkey 8405
840
The Treaties of Partition and the Spanish Succession 8469
846
The War of the Spanish Succession 8506
850
Party Government under Queen Anne 85760
857
Russia before Peter the Great 14771682 86171
861
Peter the Great and his Pupils 16891730 8725
872
The Scandinavian Kingdoms 8769
876
Charles XII and the Great Northern War 16971721 8802
880
The origin of the Prussian Monarchy The 88394
883
The Colonies and India 895902
895
European Science in the Seventeenth and earlier 90310
903
Latitudinarianism and Pietism 9117
911
Chronological Table of Leading Events 91827
918
Index
929

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 720 - Newton generalized the law of attraction into a statement that every particle of matter in the universe attracts every other particle with a force which varies directly as the product of their masses and inversely as the square of the distance between them; and he thence deduced the law of attraction for spherical shells of constant density.
Page 800 - The Doctrine and Discipline of Divorce: Restor'd to the good of both Sexes, From the bondage of Canon Law, and other mistakes, to the true meaning of Scripture in the Law and Gospel compar'd.
Page 745 - From the entrance into this unnatural war, his natural cheerfulness and vivacity grew clouded, and a kind of sadness and dejection of spirit stole upon him, which he had never been used to ; yet being one of those who believed that one battle would end all differences, and that there would be so great a victory on one side, that the other would be compelled to submit to any conditions from the victor, which supposition...
Page 713 - The squares of the periodic times of the planets are proportional to the cubes of their mean distances from the Sun.
Page 97 - That the Church's welfare, that unity and peace, and his majesty's satisfaction, were ends upon which they were all agreed : but as to the means, they could not come to any 886. harmony.
Page 329 - AB, do declare that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take arms against the king, and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissioned by him...
Page 222 - That the lords and commons are of opinion, that there hath been, and still is, a damnable and hellish plot, contrived and carried on by the Popish recusants, for assassinating the king, for subverting the government, and for rooting out and destroying the Protestant religion.".
Page 96 - ... we do declare a Liberty to Tender Consciences and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matters of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 97 - ... that the sole supreme command of the militia, and of all forces by sea and land, had ever been by the laws of England the undoubted right of the crown ; that neither house of parliament could pretend to it, nor could lawfully levy any war offensive or defensive against his majesty.
Page 249 - That king James II. having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of the kingdom by breaking the original contract between king and people; and, by the advice of jesuits and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom, has abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby become vacant.

Bibliographic information