Notes on the Sea-shore, Or, Random Sketches: In Relation to the Ancient Town of Hull, Its Settlement, Its Inhabitants, and Its Social and Political Institutions : to the Fisheries, Fishing Parties, and Boat Sailing : to Boston Harbor and Its Islands ... (Google eBook)

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Redding & Company, 1848 - Fishing - 54 pages
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Page 25 - Awful calamities; or, The shipwrecks of December, 1839, being a full account of the dreadful hurricanes of Dec. 15, 21 & 27, on the coast of Massachusetts;. . .and also of the dreadful disasters at Gloucester. Boston: J. Howe, 1840. 24 p. 8".
Page 30 - ... cover as much of the surface of the pot as possible ; next, a layer of potatoes; then put in two table-spoonsful of salt, and a tea-spoonful of pepper; then, again, the pork, another layer of fish, what potatoes may be left, and fill the pot up with water, so as to completely cover the whole. .Put the pot over a good fire, and let the chowder boil twenty-five minutes. When this is done, put in a quart of sweet milk, if you have it handy, and ten or a dozen small hard crackers, split. Let the...
Page 30 - England, and then proceeds with what I give you as a legitimate belonging to any faithful chronicle of the place I am describing : — " A Fish Chowder is a simple thing to make. For a family of twelve to fifteen persons, all you have to do is this : — In the first place, catch your fish — as Mrs. Glass would say — either with a silver or some other kind of a hook ; a codfish, not a haddock, weighing ten or twelve pounds. There is more nutriment in the former than in the latter. Have it well...
Page 15 - Notes on the Sea Shore ; or Random Sketches" by the "Shade of Alden " (Boston, 1848). His remarks on "Wrecks and Wreckers " give us a contemporaneous picture of the place and of some of its inhabitants not obtainable elsewhere, and of such interest, that they are quoted at length. He says* : " Hull is a great place for wreckers, and for wrecks. Mr. Tower, Mr. Mitchell, and some others, whose exertions have often been witnessed amidst the tempest and the storm on Nantasket beach and its vicinity,...
Page 15 - Favorite, at low water, was formerly used as a shelter for horses, when the stable of Mr. Tower was full : it is now too deeply embedded in the sand for that purpose. There are numerous relics of the old ship Mohawk, which was wrecked off P. Alderton, with a valuable cargo, from Liverpool : her figurehead decorates one of Mitchell's buildings : her roundhouse he uses as a counting-room, and for other purposes. I have been informed that, at one period, the inhabitants held their political and town...
Page 30 - ... of a hook; a codfish, not a haddock, weighing ten or twelve pounds. There is more nutriment in the former than in the latter. Have it well cleaned by your fish-monger, (keeping the skin on) and cut into slices of an inch and a half in thickness — preserving the head, which is the best part of it for a chowder. Take a pound and a half of clear or fat pork, and cut that into thin slices ; do the same with ten or twelve middling-sized potatoes. Then make your chowder, thus : — Take the largest...
Page 35 - ... a simple bar of sand — as if mad with its detention, roars like protracted thunder ; and the wild sea birds, borne along by the furious waters are dashed to death against the cliffs ! Standing at such an hour upon the rocks, I have seen the waves bend bars of iron, an inch in diameter, double — float rocks of granite, sixteen feet in length, as if they were timbers of wood...
Page 15 - Hullonians are in the habit of buying wrecks, and then breaking them up — saving the iron, copper, and such other parts as are valuable, and using the wood for fuel. The wreck...
Page 30 - ... slices of an inch and a half in thickness — preserving the head, which is the best part of it for a chowder. Take a pound and a half of clear or fat pork, and cut that into thin slices ; do the same with ten or twelve middling-sized potatoes. Then make your chowder, thus : — Take the largest pot you have in the house, if it be not " as large as all out-doors ; " try out the pork first, and then take it out of the pot, leaving in the drippings. Put three pints of water with the drippings;...
Page 26 - In Hull bay there are several islands, on which are produced yearly many tons of excellent hay, besides large quantities of corn, oats, barley and rye ; and the hills on the main land are also productive. These prominent and beautiful eminences, •when our pilgrim fathers landed on these shores, and the Indian trod the soil in the majesty of his nature and his strength, with none to molest or make him afraid, were crowned with vigorous oaks.

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