Trafficking and prostitution reconsidered: new perspectives on migration, sex work, and human rights

Front Cover
Paradigm Publishers, Jun 25, 2005 - Political Science - 247 pages
4 Reviews
Trafficking and prostitution are widely believed to be synonymous, and to be leading international crimes. This collection argues against such sensationalism and advances carefully considered and grounded alternatives for understanding transnational migrations, forced labor, sex work, and livelihood strategies under new forms of globalization. From their long-term engagements as anti-trafficking advocates, the authors unpack the contemporary international debate on trafficking. They maintain that rather than a new 'white slave trade, ' we are witnessing today, more broadly, an increase in the violation of the rights of freedom of movement, decent employment, and social and economic security. Critical examinations of state anti-trafficking interventions, including the US-led War on Trafficking, also reveal links to a broader attack on undocumented migrants, tribal and aboriginal peoples, poor women, men and children, and sex workers. The book sheds new light on everyday circumstances, popular discourses, and strategies for survival under twenty-first century economic and political conditions, with a focus on Asia, but with lessons globally.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered: New Perspectives on Migration, Sex Work, and Human Rights

User Review  - Morgan - Goodreads

Finally a book for my trafficking class that I enjoyed! Read full review

Review: Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered: New Perspectives on Migration, Sex Work, and Human Rights

User Review  - Amy - Goodreads

Got because I thought I'd need for a paper but didn't end up using it at all. I think I read the intro. May not ever read it, but someone in a class told me she was the best ethnographer writing about ... Read full review

Contents

Renegotiating the
25
The Trouble with Prevention in the
43
Reflections by an Antitrafficking Activist
65
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information