Systemic Work with Organizations: A New Model for Managers and Change Agents

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Karnac Books, Jan 1, 1994 - Psychology - 206 pages
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Systemic Work with Organisations explores a powerful new perspective on the challenges faced by managers and consultants who work in large organisations. Building on principles and methods originally developed in the family arena, the authors show how an emphasis on connection, context, and communication can help managers and others involved in change, deal with issues of identity, leadership, and learning faced by staff in today's complex work environment. The main thesis is that one way cause and effect thinking and a central focus on the role of the individual, is no longer sufficient. Managers and change agents now need to make use of the insights and interventions offered by a systemic perspective that highlights the roles played by circularity and reflexivity in how people construct shared meaning in human systems. In early chapters the three authors develop bridges between the family and organisational fields, exploring the ideas and methods of systemic and constructionist thinking in preparation for the three detailed case studies which illustrate systemic thinking in action. Concluding chapters pull together the strands to present a view of the stance and methods of constructionist consulting, the authors' version of the systemic approach. This complementary focus on relations and meaning in human systems offers managers the opportunity to use insights from a broad range of other disciplines to improve their contribution to resolving challenges faced by public and private organisations. The approach offered is a practical one and will be of interest to managers, consultants, and change agents who wish to improve their understanding of the complex worlds they now work in.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
9
IV
28
V
59
VI
61
VII
84
VIII
103
IX
121
X
123
XI
148
XII
167
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About the author (1994)

As a child in New York, author Joseph Campbell (1904-1987) became interested in Native Americans and mythology through books about American Indians and visits to the American Museum of Natural History. He wrote more than 40 books including The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949), The Mythic Image (1974), and The Power of Myth (1988) with Bill Moyers, and is now considered one of the foremost interpreters of sacred tradition in modern time. Campbell earned his B.A. and M.A. degrees at Columbia University in 1925 and 1927, but quit the doctoral program when he was told that mythology was not an acceptable subject for his thesis. He subsequently studied medieval French and Sanskrit in Paris and Germany, taught at the Canterbury School, and in 1934, joined the literature department at Sarah Lawrence College. During the 1940s and 1950s he collaborated with Swami Nikhilananda on translations of the Upanishads and The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna.

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