Snow Crash

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Bantam Books, 1993 - Fiction - 470 pages
2072 Reviews
"A cross between "Neuromancer" and Thomas Pynchon's "Vineland." This is no mere hyperbole." -- "San Francisco Bay Guardian."

"Fast-forwarded free-style mall mythology for the 21st Century." -- William Gibson.

Only once in a great while does a writer come along who defies comparison -- a writer so original he redefines the way we look at the world. Neal Stephenson is such a writer and "Snow Crash" is such a novel, weaving virtual reality, Sumerian myth, and just about everything in between with a cool, hip cyber-sensibility to bring us the gigantic thriller of the information age. In reality, Hiro Protagonist delivers pizza for Uncle Enzo's Cosa Nostra Inc., but it the Metaverse he's a warrior prince. Plunging headlong into the enigma of a new computer virus that's striking down hackers everywhere, he races along the neon-lit streets on a search-and-destroy mission for the shadowy virtual villain threatening to bring about infocalypse. "Snow Crash" is a mind-altering romp through a future America so bizarre, so outrageous... you'll recognize it immediately.

"Brilliantly realized... Stephenson turns out to be an engaging guide to an onrushing tomorrow." -- "The New York Times Book Review."

"Snow Crash takes on a whole slew of nasty contemporary trends and extrapolates them hilariously into a pessimistic and unlikely newar future... this is one book to chill out with this summer." -- "Mondo" 2000.

"Stylish noir extrapolation becomes gloriously witty social satire... savor Stephenson's delicious prose and cheerfully impudent wit. Cyberpunk isn't dead -- it has just (belatedly) developed a sense of humor." -- "Locus."

"A fantastic,slam-bang-overdrive, supersurrealistic, comic-spooky whirl through a tomorrow that is already happening. Neal Stephenson is intelligent, perceptive, hip and will become a major force in American writing." -- Timothy Leary.

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loved the pace and the writing. - Goodreads
Vry difficult to read in places. - Goodreads
Good villians, fun depiction of an alternate future. - Goodreads
I don't feel like rehashing the plot. - Goodreads
Prescient insight into online connectedness. - Goodreads
Strong beginning, interesting premise. - Goodreads

Review: Snow Crash

User Review  - José Ángel - Goodreads

When I started reading this book, I thought it was great. Great future (?) world, great characters, interesting plot... but somehow it stopped atracting me. I don't know the reason, but I just left it ... Read full review

Review: Snow Crash

User Review  - Mirko Raca - Goodreads

Loved the mythological elements, and a bit surprised the way the end played out. An excellent read, I'm sorry it took me such a long time to finish it. Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
19
Section 3
27
Copyright

43 other sections not shown

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About the author (1993)

Neal Stephenson issues from a clan of rootless, itinerant hardscience and engineering professors (mostly Pac-10, Big 10, and Big 8 with the occasional wild strain of Ivy). He began his higher education as a physics major, then switched to geography when it appeared that this would enable him to scam more free time on his university’s mainframe computer. When he graduated and discovered, to his perplexity, that there were no jobs for inexperienced physicist-geographers, he began to look into alternative pursuits such as working on cars, unimaginably stupid agricultural labor, and writing novels. His first novel, The Big U, was published in 1984 and vanished without a trace. His second novel, Zodiac: An Eco-Thriller, came out in 1988 and quickly developed a cult following among water-pollution-control engineers. It was also enjoyed, though rarely bought, by many radical environmentalists. Snow Crash was written in the years 1988 through 1991 as the author listened to a great deal of loud, relentless, depressing music.

Mr. Stephenson now resides in a comfortable home in the western hemisphere and spends all of his time trying to retrofit an office into its generally dark, unlevel, and asbestos-laden basement so that he can attempt to write more novels. Despite the tremendous amounts of time he devotes to writing, playing with computers, listening to speed metal, Rollerblading, and pounding nails, he is a flawless husband, parent, neighbor, and all-around human being.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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