Intellectual Observer; Review of Natural History, Microscopic Research and Recreative Science, Volume 12 (Google eBook)

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Groombridge., 1868
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Page 380 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed by the Creator into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved.
Page 330 - I have seen the wild stone-avalanches of the Alps, which smoke and thunder down the declivities, with a vehemence almost sufficient to stun the observer. I have also seen snow-flakes descending so softly as not to hurt the fragile spangles of which they were composed ; yet to produce, from aqueous vapor, a quantity...
Page 330 - the wild stoneavalanches of the Alps, which smoke and thunder down the declivities with a vehemence almost sufficient to stun the observer. I have also seen snow-flakes descending so softly as not to hurt the fragile spangles of which they were composed; yet to produce from aqueous vapour a quantity which a child could carry of that tender material demands an exertion of energy competent to gather up the shattered blocks of the largest stone-avalanche I have ever seen, and pitch them to twice the...
Page 170 - For the outrageous and excessive apparel of divers people, against their estate and degree, to the great destruction and impoverishment of all the land...
Page 88 - We may infer from the facts above mentioned that the colouring matter of blood, like indigo, is capable of existing in two states of oxidation, distinguishable by a difference of colour and a fundamental difference i/i the action on the spectrum.
Page 392 - The conclusions he had thus been able to arrive at are the following : (1) That the surface of the chalk in the Valley of the Somme had assumed its present form prior to the deposition of any of the gravel or loess...
Page 402 - Capra hircus. The fourth skull belonged to the pig, and had a round hole in the frontals rather larger than a crown piece, which had the appearance of being made by human hands. The presence of the lower jaws with the skulls indicates that they were deposited in the cavern while the ligaments still bound them together. They were all more or less covered with decaying stalagmite. The outer chamber was remarkable for the absence of earth of any kind, except underneath the hole in the roof, where there...
Page 179 - Kingdom, and for more effectually employing the Poor, by prohibiting the use and wear of all printed, painted, stained, or dyed Callicoes in Apparel, Household Stuff, Furniture or otherwise...
Page 402 - But the fact of finding the skulls in one group, coupled with the presence of the hole in the frontals of the pig, leads us to believe that they have been introduced by the hand of man. The entrance was far too small to admit of an ox falling into the cave by accident, and scarcely large enough for a goat or deer to squeeze themselves through ; had they been brought in by wolf or fox, the bones would have exhibited marks of teeth. In 1863 Mr. James Parker explored a cave in the limestone cliffs at...
Page 46 - In a room underneath this, and separated from it by two floors, is a piano. Through the two floors passes a tin tube 2J inches in diameter, and along the axis of this tube passes a rod of deal, the end of which emerges from the floor in front of the lecture table. The rod is clasped by india-rubber bands, which entirely close the tin tube. The lower end of the rod rests upon the sound-board of the piano, its upper end being exposed before you. An artist is at this moment engaged at the instrument,...

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