The development of the drama (Google eBook)

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Scribner, 1903 - 351 pages
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Page 201 - Afric of the other, and so many other under-kingdoms, that the player, when he comes in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived? Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
Page 192 - ... he was covered a vizard like a swine's snout upon his face, with three wire chains fastened thereunto, the other end whereof being holden severally by those three ladies, who fall to singing again, and then discovered his face, that the spectators might see how they had transformed him going on with their singing.
Page 201 - ... the player when he comes in, must ever begin with telling where he is, or else the tale will not be conceived. Now you shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of a shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
Page 192 - ... and then discovered his face, that the spectators might see how they had transformed him going on with their singing. Whilst all this was acting, there came forth of another door at the farthest end of the stage two old men, the one in blue, with a sergeant-at-arms...
Page 201 - Now you shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place: then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave: while in the mean time two armies fly in, represented with four swords and bucklers, and then what hard heart will not receive it for a pitched field?
Page 192 - ... mace on his shoulder, the other in red with a drawn sword in his hand and leaning with the other hand upon the other's shoulder ; and so they two went along in a soft pace round about by the skirt of the stage, till at last they came to the cradle, when all the court was in the greatest jollity; and then the foremost old man with his mace struck a fearful blow upon the cradle...
Page 193 - ... blow upon the cradle, whereat all the courtiers with the three ladies and the vizard all vanished; and the desolate prince, starting up bare-faced and finding...
Page 192 - ... and admonitions, that in the end they got him to lie down in a cradle upon the stage, where these three ladies, joining in a sweet song, rocked him asleep...
Page 5 - His was the spell o'er hearts, Which only Acting lends — The youngest of the Sister Arts, Where all their beauty blends. " For ill can Poetry express Full many a tone of thought sublime : And Painting mute and motionless Steals but one glance from Time. " But, by the mighty Actor brought, Illusion's wedded triumphs come — Verse ceases to be airy thought, And Sculpture to be dumb.
Page 44 - Be that as it may, tragedy— as also comedy— was at first mere improvisation. The one originated with the leaders of the dithyramb, the other with those of the phallic songs, which are still in use in many of our cities.

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